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paul mc c

Bolting pier to concrete base help.

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Hello all,im looking a bit of advice on fixing my pier to concrete,it will need to be bolted to the solid concrete base,the holes on the bottom flange of the pier are 16mm so what are the best options and what has others used.

Thanks Paul.

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Best thing is 2 part chemical fixing and stainless steel threaded rod.

Get the stuff that mixes as you squirt it with a mastic gun, don't use the ready mixed stuff in glass phials.

Dave

Edited by Davey-T
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Is this like a resin,and if so how much wider does the hole have to be than the threaded rod.

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23 minutes ago, paul mc c said:

Is this like a resin,and if so how much wider does the hole have to be than the threaded rod.

Googling "resin anchor hole size" should bring up some info on this. 

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2 minutes ago, paul mc c said:

I was considering these as well but wasnt sure what would be the best thing to use.

I have three xrays units hung on walls for 3 years using these, and they get daily use and havent moved.  You could always gripfill the underside first too

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Tricky things to drill in concrete and get a nice fit for those bolts.

The 2 pack stuff is more forgiving, just keep pumping it in until the hole is full then stick the rod in and weigh it down with a brick to stop it oozing up  the hole size is usually on the pack.

I'd do one first, stick the pier on it then drill the others to allow for the drill wandering.

Dave

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31 minutes ago, Davey-T said:

Tricky things to drill in concrete and get a nice fit for those bolts.

I dont agree Davey!  You drill a slightly smaller hole that the bolt, then screw it in with a ratchet/socket or a spanner until it's tight.  They automatically cut their own path and tighten seriously tight.

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2 minutes ago, tooth_dr said:

I dont agree Davey!  You drill a slightly smaller hole that the bolt, then screw it in with a ratchet/socket or a spanner until it's tight.  They automatically cut their own path and tighten seriously tight.

Depends how good the concrete is, they work fine in brick although they can shatter the brick when tightened, if they fail to catch they just keep pulling up until they hopefully catch, I have used them extensively and ended up always using the chemical bolts as they were more reliable and trouble free.

Just my opinion :grin:

Dave

 

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Just now, Davey-T said:

Depends how good the concrete is, they work fine in brick although they can shatter the brick when tightened, if they fail to catch they just keep pulling up until they hopefully catch, I have used them extensively and ended up always using the chemical bolts as they were more reliable and trouble free.

Just my opinion :grin:

Dave

 

Fair enough lol. Never needed to resort to chemical bolts myself, and simple to use.

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2 minutes ago, tooth_dr said:

Fair enough lol. Never needed to resort to chemical bolts myself, and simple to use.

In general the thunder bolts work OK but only needs one not to work to ruin your day :grin:

Plus if the substrata is a bit iffy you can just keep going deeper to get a fixing with chemical bolts, as long as you don't come out in next doors kitchen :rolleyes2:

Dave

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On 22/01/2018 at 14:30, paul mc c said:

Is this like a resin,and if so how much wider does the hole have to be than the threaded rod.

Hi

That's how I did mine.

12mm bolts and kit came with a 14mm masonary bit.

If you have access to an old hoover it helps clearing the debris from the holes.

You get around 20 mins before the resin starts to harden so good prep is important and do one bolt at a time.

I put the nut right down over the bolt to protect the thread from any resin but they hold position well (just make sure they are staright!)

You can see my efforts here.

 

Neil

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I'm another fan of the twin pack resin. I've always been a bit casual about the hole size, I'm afraid, but I've never had any problems. The stuff will never ever come out! Changes of pier involve angle grinding the old studs off flush. You won't burst the concrete and they'll never work loose.

Olly

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Yes another +1 for twin pack polyester resin (not vials).  Hilti Hit System is about as good as it gets, but it is very expensive.  Stuff I used shown below, available from Screwfix, is very good in this application.  I used 4 x M16 stainless steel studs, again available from Screwfix, drill 18mm hole, blow out thoroughly as mentioned above, and fill hole just over half way with resin.  Drive stud slowly with a socket on a slow drill (you can just push them in but they are designed to be twisted in to ensure the resin penetrates the threads).  Wipe of excess resin (if you've filled the hole correctly there should only be a little bit) and then leave to dry.  Don't worry about a bit of resin in the threads at the bottom of the bolt as this will be accounted for with your pier bottom plate.  

As mentioned by @Davey-T it is a good idea to drill the holes through the mount base as the drill can easily wander, and it doesn't take much before you have problems fitting the mount.  You could even make a very simple template from cardboard or a thin piece of ply, so once set with the resin still wet, you put the template just over the head of the threads to align them.

Nice thing about the resin as mentioned by @ollypenrice is that the concrete doesn't get stressed, and even if it is already cracked, these will work fine. 

I have a lot of kit hanging off mine and it is about as solid as you will get.

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I have had a night mare...........while drilling the holes for the threaded bolts,i used M16 bolts and 20mm holes,firstly i blew my drill......them borrowed another heavy duty one........yip that one blew,but this was just a coincidence......bought another drill and finally drilled the holes,success..........not really,after applying the resin i the first hole,the gun broke........had to rush out and buy another heavy duty one,by this time half the nozzle had hardened,no problem,cut the hard bit off,got the rest of the bolts in,only to come back to fit the pier and this is where the real nightmare happened.........only two of the holes matched up,only by a few mm,im normally very carefull,but this has just been one of those days.:help:.

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18 hours ago, paul mc c said:

I have had a night mare...........while drilling the holes for the threaded bolts,i used M16 bolts and 20mm holes,firstly i blew my drill......them borrowed another heavy duty one........yip that one blew,but this was just a coincidence......bought another drill and finally drilled the holes,success..........not really,after applying the resin i the first hole,the gun broke........had to rush out and buy another heavy duty one,by this time half the nozzle had hardened,no problem,cut the hard bit off,got the rest of the bolts in,only to come back to fit the pier and this is where the real nightmare happened.........only two of the holes matched up,only by a few mm,im normally very carefull,but this has just been one of those days.:help:.

problem is that the drill will deflect when drilling concrete if it hits a hard stone etc. not much you can do about it except make the holes in the pier slightly bigger than the threaded rod to allow a little tolerance.

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19 hours ago, paul mc c said:

I have had a night mare...........while drilling the holes for the threaded bolts,i used M16 bolts and 20mm holes,firstly i blew my drill......them borrowed another heavy duty one........yip that one blew,but this was just a coincidence......bought another drill and finally drilled the holes,success..........not really,after applying the resin i the first hole,the gun broke........had to rush out and buy another heavy duty one,by this time half the nozzle had hardened,no problem,cut the hard bit off,got the rest of the bolts in,only to come back to fit the pier and this is where the real nightmare happened.........only two of the holes matched up,only by a few mm,im normally very carefull,but this has just been one of those days.:help:.

You can't beat having the right tools for the job, I'm lucky having worked in the building industry for years.

You need a proper drill for concrete one that costs £70.00 that may blow up or one that costs £200.00 that won't, sort of job that it's best to hire something man enough for the job.

Not much good in hindsight but it was mentioned somewhere in this or a similar thread to do one hole then bolt the pier on it and drill the others though the pier.

Dave

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Another option is to go for the chemfix - chembolts.  https://www.sealantsonline.co.uk/ProductGrp/004400510001

Just Drill a hole into the concrete and resin fix them in to get a nice flush fit.  Then you just bolt into them from the top with standard bolts.  The advantage is that if you wish to remove your pier, you don't get any nasty threaded rods sticking out of the ground.  Councils use them to fix bollards and the like.

Hope this helps
John

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On 1/22/2018 at 17:02, Davey-T said:

The 2 pack stuff is more forgiving, just keep pumping it in until the hole is full then stick the rod in and weigh it down with a brick to stop it oozing up  the hole size is usually on the pack.

I use this for everything. Piers, satellite dishes, anything that needs a solid attachment to concrete or brick/block work.

One thing I do is squeeze some resin onto the thread of the rod as well as into the hole. That ensures there is "wetting" which gives a better result. Also, don't fill the drilled hole too full of resin as the rod will displace a lot of it and it could squirt out in any direction.
The amount of time you have between mixing it and it hardening is measured in minutes. So I would suggest that you have everything ready, holes drilled, before you start with the adhesive. Then do all of them in quick succession with just the one nozzle.

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