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Did anyone see Jupiter and Mars close together late last night / early this morning ? The Jovian moons were especially impressive as they were bunched up together like cat's eyes on both sides - reminded me a bit of Sigma Orionis 

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Yeah I saw it as I was half way through packing my imaging gear away. Gutted. It was a nice naked eye site though.

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I managed to capture this view using my unmoddified Canon 7D with 100-400mm lens @ 400mm, f8, 0.5sec, ISO800.

In frame with nu Librae and SAO159030.
 

IMG_9195---crop.thumb.jpg.e9b5562d1dadad9cd2395604fca06881.jpg

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I am in Demark at the moment and it is clear (but viciously cold) the sky is wonderful though.  However, no telescope with me.  This morning around 8am the moon was up and little distance away lower and to the left by my eye, there was a huge light point and a smaller one to the lower left of that.  Do you think that could have been Jupiter and Mars too?

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1 hour ago, JOC said:

I am in Demark at the moment and it is clear (but viciously cold) the sky is wonderful though.  However, no telescope with me.  This morning around 8am the moon was up and little distance away lower and to the left by my eye, there was a huge light point and a smaller one to the lower left of that.  Do you think that could have been Jupiter and Mars too?

Yes, it will have been them. Lovely naked eye view, Mars looks very orange in comparison to Jupiter.

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IMG_5944.PNG

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Hi Stu, cheers, yes that looks like what I saw.  They were really clear in the sky and really quite pretty.  Having previously read this thread I was trying to look out for them, but its great to have someone concur esp. When I didn't have a scope on them to confirm  :-)

Edited by JOC

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1 minute ago, JOC said:

Hi Stu, cheers, yes that looks like what I saw.  They were really clear in the sky and really quite pretty.

Nice, weren't they? Although it was good to view them in the scope on Sunday morning, I did think the naked eye view was every bit as good to view, colours were stronger to my eye.

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The biggest problem with my view was that it was through a taxi window!  However, they were still nice :-)

Edited by JOC
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Monday morning, 07.30 am so getting very light. Just held my android phone to the eyepiece..

Lovely naked eye sight too☺

Dave

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1 hour ago, moriniboy said:

My attempt using a scope and mobile phone.

cameringo_20180107_063328.jpg

Excellent shot!

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The current SGL competition is for Mobile phone pictures!

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18 minutes ago, JOC said:

The current SGL competition is for Mobile phone pictures!

Indeed it is. Trouble is there will probably be around a hundred entries showing almost exactly the same thing ;) Tough for the judges!

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I've posted it on another forum...on a 6AM flight from Porto to Frankfurt on Dec 6, I've enjoyed a spectacular conjunction over a sea of clouds, it was sublime. Airplane windows do not make the best optical conduits, but still...my son liked it too. And then...sunrise. We were floating east throughout the flight.

Life is so wonderful sometimes, even without the scopes. :icon_biggrin:

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