Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

stargazine_ep24_banner.thumb.jpg.56e65b9c9549c15ed3f06e146fc5f5f1.jpg

MikeODay

The Great Barred Spiral Galaxy ( NGC 1365 ) in the constellation Fornax

Recommended Posts

43928C6C-7839-4B04-AD5F-0576BF935F0F.thumb.jpeg.7193eba682b7643eebdd64057ea12d6f.jpeg

( please click/tap image to see larger )

Identification:

The Great Barred Spiral Galaxy
New General Catalogue -  NGC 1365
General Catalogue -  GC 731
John Herschel ( Cape of Good Hope ) # 2552 - Nov 28, 29 1837
Principal Galaxy Catlogue - PCG 13179
ESO 358-17
IRAS 03317-3618

RA (2000.0) 3h 33m 37.2 s
DEC (2000.0) -36 deg 8' 36.5"

10th magnitude Seyfert-type galaxy in the Fornaux cluster of galaxies
200 Kly diameter
60 Mly distance

..................

Capture Details:

Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ).
Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x.
Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1400mm f4.7

Mount: Skywatcher EQ
Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 

Camera:  Nikon D7500 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.7mm, 5568x3712 @ 4.196um pixels)

Location:
Blue Mountains, Australia 
Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map )

Capture ( 24 Dec 2017 )
7 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 4s to 240s ) all at ISO400.
52 x 240s + 5 each @ 4s to 120s
total around 2.5hrs 

Processing ( Pixinsight )
Calibration: master bias, master flat and no darks
Integration in 7 sets
HDR combination 

Image - Plate Solution
==========================================
Resolution ........ 1.328 arcsec/px
Rotation .......... -0.008 deg  ( North is up )
Field of view ..... 58' 8.6" x 38' 47.5"
Image center ...... RA: 03 33 41.182  Dec: -36 07 46.71
==========================================

Edited by MikeODay
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Stargazer33
      Taken on the night of 12 September. 
      NGC6826 - The Blinking Nebula.
      This on Wiki:
      NGC6826 is a planetary nebula located in the constellation Cygnus. It is commonly referred to as the "blinking planetary", although many other nebulae exhibit such "blinking". When viewed through a small telescope, the brightness of the central star overwhelms the eye when viewed directly, obscuring the surrounding nebula. However, it can be viewed well using averted vision, which causes it to "blink" in and out of view as the observer's eye wanders. A distinctive feature of this nebula are the two bright patches on either side, which are known as Fast Low-Ionization Emission Regions, or FLIERS. They appear to be relatively young, moving outwards at supersonic speeds.
      Right ascension: 19 h 44 m 48.2 s
      Declination: +50° 31′ 30.3″
      Distance: ~2000 ly
      Apparent magnitude (V): 8.8
      Apparent dimensions (V): 27″ × 24″
      Constellation: Cygnus
      Radius: 0.22 x 0.20 ly
      Designations: HD 186924, SAO 31951, Caldwell 15
       
      Equipment: 
      Imaging: C9.25; CGEM (diy hypertuned); ASI385MC; Baader neodymium filter; Astro Photography Tool
      Guiding: Travelscope 70; SSAG; PHD2
      Processing: DSS; Photoshop CS4 Extended 
      99 x 20" lights, of which 63 were stacked; 50 x darks; 50x bias; 50 x flats

      Looks like I'm going to have to have another go at my collimation. Very happy with this even so, as it's the first serious imaging I've done for sooo long! A lot more data is required to bring out the detail in the nebula. 
      Comments/suggestions welcome.
    • By stepping beyond
      I've had 3  new mounts since after Xmas last year and it has been a real pita trying to get the first to mounts to operate correctly with my Sgp Software . March rolled in and I had lost too much time trying to get the 1st 2 mounts to do the job . I dipped back in the kitty and got an AVX straight out of the box took me to galaxies FAR FAR AWAY, WOOHOO! I've been trying to process the galaxy for a mount  and match it with my archived data and finally I'm getting somewhere.

    • By Camalajs525
      Since I am very new to this, I struggle a lot. Especially when observing planets and also recently deep sky objects. My telescope is an amateur telescope and its almost 11 years old (The telescope was re used a year ago). During summer of last year I took photos of Saturn,Jupiter and a month ago took photos of Venus and Mars. About 2 days ago I stumbled upon a new thing in the sky, (Unfortunately, I didn't take a picture). It definitely was in the Orion constellation  as I had observed Betelgeuse and the 3 stars that were close to each other. After a couple of minutes later I saw 2 stars next to each other and another two which were on top of the other star, surrounding these set of stars were a blue-ish and grey-ish colour at the same time. I had done some research and many people told me it was the trapezium cluster found in Orion. I honestly don't know. Any ideas? Thanks. 
    • By stevewanstall
      Celestron 9.25 at f6.3, SW EQ6R pro, Canon 550 D modded
      The galaxy group Hickson 44 in Leo. This is based on 29 x 240 s, plus bias and flats.

      Hickson 44 in Leo:

      There are some other galaxies near by, some of which are names in this overlay from Astrometry.net:

      Overlay from Astrometry, naming the other objects:

      The main ones are NGC 3190, NGC 3185, NGC 3187 and NGC 3193. NGC 3190 has a well defined dust lane. NGC 3187 is a barred spiral galaxy with two arms. NGC 3193 is an elliptical galaxy.
      The light captured by my camera last night left these galaxies just after the extinction event killed the dinosaurs on Earth.
      From APOD: Galaxies, like stars, frequently form groups. A group of galaxies is a system containing more than two galaxies but less than the tens or hundreds typically found in a cluster of galaxies. A most notable example is the Local Group of Galaxies, which houses over 30 galaxies including our Milky Way, Andromeda, and the Magellanic Clouds. Pictured above is nearby compact group Hickson 44. This group is located about 60 million light-years away toward the constellation of Leo. Also known as the NGC 3190 Group, Hickson 44 contains several bright spiral galaxies and one bright elliptical galaxy on the upper right. The bright source on the upper left is a foreground star. Many galaxies in Hickson 44 and other compact groups are either slowly merging or gravitationally pulling each other apart.
       
       
      Abell 1367
      This image is based on 19 x 300 s , plus flats and bias. It shows a LOT of galaxies, in a grouping called Abell 1367. In this image you are looking at part of one of the biggest structures in the Universe, the Great Wall.

      Wikipedia:
      The Leo Cluster (Abell 1367) is a galaxy cluster about 330 million light-years distant (z = 0.022) in the constellation Leo, with at least 70 major galaxies. The galaxy known as NGC 3842 is the brightest member of this cluster. Along with the Coma Cluster, it is one of the two major clusters comprising the Coma Supercluster, which in turn is part of the CfA2 Great Wall, which is hundreds of millions light years long and is one of the largest known structures in the universe.
      The overlay from Astrometry gives some of the galaxies visible in the image.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.