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The Great Barred Spiral Galaxy ( NGC 1365 ) in the constellation Fornax


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Identification:

The Great Barred Spiral Galaxy
New General Catalogue -  NGC 1365
General Catalogue -  GC 731
John Herschel ( Cape of Good Hope ) # 2552 - Nov 28, 29 1837
Principal Galaxy Catlogue - PCG 13179
ESO 358-17
IRAS 03317-3618

RA (2000.0) 3h 33m 37.2 s
DEC (2000.0) -36 deg 8' 36.5"

10th magnitude Seyfert-type galaxy in the Fornaux cluster of galaxies
200 Kly diameter
60 Mly distance

..................

Capture Details:

Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ).
Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x.
Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1400mm f4.7

Mount: Skywatcher EQ
Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 

Camera:  Nikon D7500 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.7mm, 5568x3712 @ 4.196um pixels)

Location:
Blue Mountains, Australia 
Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map )

Capture ( 24 Dec 2017 )
7 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 4s to 240s ) all at ISO400.
52 x 240s + 5 each @ 4s to 120s
total around 2.5hrs 

Processing ( Pixinsight )
Calibration: master bias, master flat and no darks
Integration in 7 sets
HDR combination 

Image - Plate Solution
==========================================
Resolution ........ 1.328 arcsec/px
Rotation .......... -0.008 deg  ( North is up )
Field of view ..... 58' 8.6" x 38' 47.5"
Image center ...... RA: 03 33 41.182  Dec: -36 07 46.71
==========================================

Edited by MikeODay
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