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KAYCE

Jupiter,Venus or Mars ?

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Would like to know whether  my photo  is one of the above object's in the morning sky looking south

7 am plus, using my DSLR 18-400 lense,setting's  1/5sec,F 6/3 200mm,ISO 1000. 26th Dec.

DSC_0344.JPG

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I would say Jupiter. Both Mars and Jupiter are visible in the mornings at the moment but Jupiter is far brighter. Mercury is also visible but would have been lower. 

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8 minutes ago, KAYCE said:

That's great Kerry,I am in Leicester,learning all the time.KAYCE.

Welcome. The mornings are quite good for the planets at the moment. Jupiter and Mars are getting closer together and get really close in early January. If you look above and to the right of Jupiter you will see Mars fainter and reddish.

Mercury is lower in the sky and to the left - but it won’t be around for long! And we need more clear mornings of course. 

‘Good luck 

 

Edited by kerrylewis

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Too bright for Mars to be seen, definitely Jupiter. 

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5 minutes ago, Knighty2112 said:

Too bright for Mars to be seen, definitely Jupiter. 

Quite right! I should have said that you will need to get up slightly earlier for Mars to be visible against a darker sky. 

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Yes, probably Jupiter - I was out at the same time.

At 7:15 the ISS passed just north of Jupiter - it was just as bright.

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Certainly Jupiter. Looking through a telescope, you can usually see darker and lighter bands in Jupiter's atmosphere, in addition to 4 moons. 

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Without checking Stellarium, im also gonna say its Jupiter. It looks identical to a few images i took yrs ago of Jupiter in the early evening sky using just a DSLR on a camera tripod and 10x zoom.

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2 minutes ago, Mattwaters said:

Jupiter and Mars definatly. There right next to each other at the moment. I want to photo both over the next few days

I didnt even notice the second object in the image. I'll take your word for it being Mars. 

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Next time you try to take a photo of it try at 400mm & with a much faster shutter speed, you should be able to see some colour and banding then.

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All 3 planets will be visible soon.

Saturn a bit later on, it will be very low in the south just above the Sagittarius 'teapot'

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On 30/12/2017 at 21:15, LukeSkywatcher said:

I didnt even notice the second object in the image. I'll take your word for it being Mars. 

This is weird. I was out this morning at 5am looking at Mars and Jup literally in one eye piece lol cant wait for a better view of mars when its closer! Did take a video and afew pictures. Not the best though

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