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Lynx1971

M42 Orion Nebula

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King of the winter night sky -Orion Nebula
As the part of our galaxy lies around 1340 light years from us and is the closest region of massive star formation to Earth.
Only 27 frames as the clouds were covering all sky as soon as I arrived.. 
Scope: Skywatcher EVOSTAR 80ED DS-Pro
Mount: AZ EQ6-GT
Camera: QHY168C
Filter Optolong L-PRO MAX Luminosity
Guiding camera: ZWO ASI120MC
Guiding scope: SW 9x50 finderscope
27x300s exposure at -10°C (135min total) 2h 15min
binning 1x1
20xdarks
30xbias
20x flats

M42 27fr 135min 2 sml.jpg

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Simply stunning, :happy11:
you have captured a lot of detail in this,

you are right about king of the winter night sky,

Regards

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That is certainly King of the winter sky and you have done it proud. Superb image and excellently processed.

Steve

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A really nice image indeed!

If I should have a small critical comment it is the large "soap bubble" around NGC1980 (in the centre of the bottom half of the image), which I expect to be an optical artifact since I have not seen it in other images of the M42.

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That's magnificent and deep!  The dust has come out really well.  I wonder if the halo is cause by your filter

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Thank you guys, the bubble is the internal  reflection between the filter and the flattener.

Actually the anti-reflection coating on SW field flattener is poor. I'm thinking how to change the arrangements through the light path, maybe placing the filter before the flattener will help? 

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It's winter and there's going to be loads of these to see ..... Hurrah!! I love Orion and this is a super rendition :) 

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4 hours ago, Lynx1971 said:

Thank you guys, the bubble is the internal  reflection between the filter and the flattener.

Actually the anti-reflection coating on SW field flattener is poor. I'm thinking how to change the arrangements through the light path, maybe placing the filter before the flattener will help? 

Sounds like you have things under control. How did you figure out the cause of the halo? Did you just try without the filter?

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3 hours ago, gorann said:

Sounds like you have things under control. How did you figure out the cause of the halo? Did you just try without the filter?

I've just observed reflections pointing the telescope on the bright stars and slightly changing the framing. The beam bounces from the filter, then again on the concaved side of the flattener goes back to the sensor. The "bubble" is slightly smaller than the diameter of the lens in flattener.. Very annoying and I'm just thinking how to remove it. I will try next time without L-PRO filter but I don't have UV filter in my camera.. 

Edited by Lynx1971

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If it is possible to move the filter in your train then that would probably solve the problem. Or getting another flattener/reducer (TS have some good ones) - but I guess it is getting a bit late for Christmas gift wishes.....

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Just now, gorann said:

If it is possible to move the filter in your train then that would probably solve the problem. Or getting another flattener/reducer (TS have some good ones) - but I guess it is getting a bit late for Christmas gift wishes.....

Yes, too late.. ;) I'm planning to change the scope maybe next year..

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