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New Constellations

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Interesting idea but I'm not sure that it's needed :icon_scratch:

I do outreach sessions where we have parties of cubs, brownies, scouts and guides along and they seem very interested in the traditional constellation patterns and the stories that go with them. Many of them already know about Hercules, Taurus, Orion, Pegasus etc and are thrilled to see the actual star patterns in the sky even where any resemblance to the mythical figure is slight :icon_biggrin:

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Maybe they should have one named   "Big Yellow Taxi"........and then look up the word   "ironic"    instead of  "iconic".

 

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Brilliant idea! We could combine it with renaming all the Messier objects after well known A roads instead of motorways. That would be a real hoot! lol :icon_scratch:

Idle minds..... tut!

Edited by brantuk
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What?? NO!!! That will never last, if kids are not inspired by astronomy out of pure interest, than they're simply not meant to be astronomers... no need to try to con them into a temporary interest in something with cartoon charters, documentary presenters or, worst of all... sport people.

Whats the goal here? long term astrophysists or temporary money making scheme attempted selling tickets for youngins thinking that they want to look through a telescope?

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If you combine a celebrity with a constellation you get a celebration :)

A new route to stardom!

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*Criiiiiiiiiinnnnnnggggge*

I'm cringing very, very hard.

In all seriousness, these will never catch on. If they don't wanna look up, they don't gotta.

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Horrified of West Sussex here.... Crazy, wasteful idea. Now, if they want to introduce some new asterisms then why not if they are desperate for 'ideas' but NOT constellations! :BangHead: In my experience, youngsters are spellbound by the stories behind many of the existing constellations even though they have no relevance to current 'celebrities'. This is just another stupid excuse for celebrity worship - as if we didn't have enough of that nonsense already.

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Obviously academics with little experience of the real world and too much time on their hands.

As an aside, it seems we are now living in a world when if you try hard enough you can get a group of "experts"  to promote any idea. 

 

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4 hours ago, John said:

Interesting idea but I'm not sure that it's needed :icon_scratch:

I do outreach sessions where we have parties of cubs, brownies, scouts and guides along and they seem very interested in the traditional constellation patterns and the stories that go with them. Many of them already know about Hercules, Taurus, Orion, Pegasus etc and are thrilled to see the actual star patterns in the sky even where any resemblance to the mythical figure is slight :icon_biggrin:

 

John

Saw your comment about scout/guide groups presentations

Do same with my own club

Have attached copy of Level 1 & 2 Space Badge for scouts have put together from scout handbook

With brownies/guides, they just have to show competence

Have attached copy of document for Level 1 & 2 Scout Space Badge

Group leaders do craft activities, and we do the practical

Find it very rewarding

Cheers

John

 

 

Space Badge.docx

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I run a astronomy club for year 7's and they already know some names of constillations, and as mentioned above enjoy the mythology,  I for one wont be going down the silly road! 

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On 12/14/2017 at 06:11, Galen Gilmore said:

*Criiiiiiiiiinnnnnnggggge*

I'm cringing very, very hard.

In all seriousness, these will never catch on. If they don't wanna look up, they don't gotta.

Same here.... 

On 12/14/2017 at 06:31, steppenwolf said:

Horrified of West Sussex here.... Crazy, wasteful idea. Now, if they want to introduce some new asterisms then why not if they are desperate for 'ideas' but NOT constellations! :BangHead: In my experience, youngsters are spellbound by the stories behind many of the existing constellations even though they have no relevance to current 'celebrities'. This is just another stupid excuse for celebrity worship - as if we didn't have enough of that nonsense already.

Whats with this "bubble wrap" our kids rubbish? This kind movement is pushed by the kind of people who never had or will have kids and yet think that they know best... gimme a break....

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On 12/14/2017 at 09:00, gonzostar said:

I run a astronomy club for year 7's and they already know some names of constillations, and as mentioned above enjoy the mythology,  I for one wont be going down the silly road! 

Kids are more clued in than the "bubble wrapping who know best" element think... and simply if a child isn't interested in a subject, naming a thing associated to it after a has-been sport person wont change that fact.

 

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I think this well DEFINITELY work and will get more young people interested in astronomy. That and a rap. All the young people like rap now - Pee Diddly and Snoopy Dog Dog and all that body poppin stuff.

Get with the times SGL!

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Who will know Pee Diddy and Snoop Dog Dog in twenty  years time? Each generation will move onto a next phase. So for me  constellations would be called Tompson twins, Tiffany, Def Leppard, Gun n roses, iron maiden, Botham,  ford Capri etc! :) 

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46 minutes ago, gonzostar said:

Who will know Pee Diddy and Snoop Dog Dog in twenty  years time? Each generation will move onto a next phase. So for me  constellations would be called Tompson twins, Tiffany, Def Leppard, Gun n roses, iron maiden, Botham,  ford Capri etc! :) 

I agree... P Diddy... snoop dog??? what astronomy got to do with drug promoting gangster wannabes? 

20 years is optimistic...

 

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