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This image is a stack of the best of 180 30-second subs of Auriga, taken using a Helios 44 58 (58mm) prime lens. I  stopped the lens down but stars at the corners are still slightly elongated. I used one of Steve's Astro Actions to correct the three brightest, the smaller ones don't spoil the overall effect. I used a moon and skyglow filter as I suffer moderate LP.

The camera was a cooled Canon 450D. A handwarmer sachet was used to keep the lens clear, although it seems humidity was very low on what was a VERY cold night.

While the wonderful clusters of young, blue stars showed up really well, the flaming star nebula was more difficult to capture on such short subs.

One of the frames included a sole Geminid meteor. This frame was processed separately aiming for a good colour balance, aligned carefully and the meteor trail layered in. The trail starts yellowish, turns blue and fades back to yellow.

On seeing just how crowded the stars are in this part of  the sky, I was reminded of Isaac Asimov's novel, The Stars, Like Dust, although it's set near the Horsehead Nebula where there is more dust than stars!

 

Auriga and Geminid.png

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very nice indeed and oh there is a lot of stars there when i did this are deep sky stacker picked out 10000 stars on a setting of 25 

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Such a rich region of stars! You did a great job capturing them and a wonderful shot of a Geminid as well!

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A magnificent sight indeed.  A proper Astro. Image to me.  Brings back good memories of slide shows of wide field images at my local Astronomy Society.      Educational too, members picking out and naming objects in the image.              Equipment and knowledge have moved on a pace since those days though.

 

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That's super.

How do you decide meteor rather than iridium flare?

I only ask because I captured something but don't know which it is.

Edited by happy-kat

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Fantastic and surprising image there! I'll have to chase it down through Stellarium - and a few others - as well.

Keep On Going!

Dave

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