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Corkeyno2

Possible New Telescope

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Hi, I have been thinking of purchasing some new telescope gear for a while and have managed to scrape some money together. Does anyone have any recommendations for what telescope or camera to get if you wanted to do solar system and deep sky imaging?

I would prefer if the telescope was not a dobsonian but has a goto system.

Budget - £2,000 to £3,000

Cheers in advance

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The two disciplines, solar and deep sky have rather different equipment requirements. You would be far better off making an early decision on which way you would prefer to go, solar or deep sky. You are right to dismiss a Dobsonian for either discipline.

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1 minute ago, steppenwolf said:

The two disciplines, solar and deep sky have rather different equipment requirements. You would be far better off making an early decision on which way you would prefer to go, solar or deep sky. You are right to dismiss a Dobsonian for either discipline.

Thanks for the reply, I would prefer to image objects within the solar system. 

Edited by Corkeyno2

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Scopes are or can be cheap for either discipline.  The mount is the key. You may even end up with a good mount like an eq6 and several scopes for different targets.

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If you want to do astrophotography, the mount is the most important part. Decide on the mount then the telescope and all the accessories you'll want. With your budget, I'd go for an Skywatcher EQ6-R or the AZ/EQ6 which is good if you want to do some visual as well. Then consider the telescope you want. A refractor will nicely image planets and deep sky objects. However, keep in mind you'll need a different kind of camera for each. Taking images of planets is all about taking short video clips and stacking them (or at least that's how I understand it to be), whereas deep sky objects need long exposures to draw out the detail. 

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The Skywatcher ed80 seem very popular for AP and will not blow to much of the budget 

The vast amount of the budget needs to go on the mount to assist successful AP. 

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Do get the book 'Making Every Photon Count' by Steve Richards', this will give you a good grounding in the art of astrophotography and the insight into what you will need. Then my two pennyworth is below.

Considering the planets are not good viewing for the next couple of years I would suggest starting with a deep sky setup. The tried and tested baseline setup for AP is the one I have used for the last 5 years, Skywatcher HEQ5 Pro Synscan mount, Skywatcher ED80 semi Apo. Others say the EQ6, however consider the weight difference between the EQ6 and HEQ5 before you finally purchase especially if you have to travel to a dark site and then set up. If you can set up in your garden then OK with the EQ6. Once you get this you will need a few extra items such as a decent power source, maybe a focal reducer, dew heaters and dew controller, camera adapter to fit your camera (I would suggest a Cannon DSLR as these are the most common in AP) to your scope and an intervolometer to take the required shots. After you have mastered taking tracking subs you can then go further into guided AP which will need further equipment, computer, guide camera, guide scope etc. As you can see AP takes a lot of time, money and patience and is a bit of a learning curve and that's before you tackle the processing. When you get to this stage you will realise that AP is an upward spiral of equipment such better mounts better scopes, CCD cooled cameras and so on, but don't be put off think of this as a journey and take your time getting there. I would also recommend going to your local astronomical society as they will have members well experienced in AP and you can get first hand advice.

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