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The attached LRGB image of NGC2903 represents just under 10hours integration time. During processing I noticed some structure within the (very bright) core which I've tried to extract, to me, the core resembles blue stars. 

If I put the finished result through Pixinsight's image solver, it informs me that I'd also imaged NGC2905. If I do a quick internet search on NGC2905, then it appears to be another galaxy. Since I don't believe you can have a galaxy within a galaxy,  I'm confused. However, I hope you like the image :hello:

(If anyone can explain the difference between NGC2903, NGC2905 and the objects in the core of the image then it would be appreciated).

Alan

5a29551d7e978_35.crop4to5.thumb.jpg.a1adbd8d0053edae8d32cd5697bf34a6.jpg

 

_35_crop_4_to_5_Annotated.thumb.jpg.d106f990ac1fcb41222934c3d830e49d.jpg

LIGHTS: L:13, R: 19, G:13, B: 13. DARKS:30; FLATS:40, BIAS:100 all at -20C.

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8 minutes ago, furrysocks2 said:

Nice pic!

Wikipedia says:

Another quote I found...

blob.png.784d65215eb19d0a0da89bfc2f33eed9.png

Thanks that would make sense !

What I find confusing is that if you look on some databases, NGC2905 is classified as a galaxy:

eg have a look at the following link which takes you to what I believe is an authoritative database source

http://simbad.u-strasbg.fr/simbad/sim-id?Ident=NGC+2905

 

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4 minutes ago, furrysocks2 said:

Yes, I found some ambiguity too. I just picked a couple of quotes that appeared to make sense.

Yes, a bit strange - perhaps it is a case of fake galaxy news.....

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38 minutes ago, cfpendock said:

This is a cracking image, with excellent detain within the galaxy(ies) perhaps a tad over-saturated, but that is just me....

Chris

Thanks for the comment Chris.

I think the detail was helped by my decision to discard any subs associated with poor seeing conditions. On the colour front, I have a tenancy to go for what I would probably describe as "strong" colours :happy11:

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Great image.

I think I've seen this target represented twice in the ngc catalogue, as 2903 and as 2905. But I can't find the exact reference, atm. Some other ngc objects also have double numbers in the catalogue.

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47 minutes ago, wimvb said:

Great image.

I think I've seen this target represented twice in the ngc catalogue, as 2903 and as 2905. But I can't find the exact reference, atm. Some other ngc objects also have double numbers in the catalogue.

Thanks for the comment Wim. 

I think you are correct,  when I type NGC2903 into the SIMBAD database and then click on the identifiers tab, NGC2905 comes up, so I think this is a double naming. :help: I'm still not entirely sure what is going on at the core, I think I shall investigate further. 

Alan 

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I believe that in the past, objects were observed and entered independently. Maybe a small error in position or not careful enough reading of the list caused entry of already included objects as new.

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6 minutes ago, wimvb said:

I believe that in the past, objects were observed and entered independently. Maybe a small error in position or not careful enough reading of the list caused entry of already included objects as new.

Yes that is entirely believable.

I've just downloaded the (free) windows desktop app Aladin, which appears to be an extremely detailed source of astronomical info - http://aladin.u-strasbg.fr/

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