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John

Schroter's Valley - Wow !!!

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John    18,080

If you have not yet observed the superb winding rille of Schroter's Valley then tonight is a great time to give it a go. It is illuminated superbly at the current time :icon_biggrin:

The magnificent craters Herodotus and Aristarchus are also looking their very best with dark and light markings showing clearly within the latters internal walls and terraces. The "Cobra's Head" at the beginning of Schroters Valley is between these distictive craters.

Lovely lunar :icon_biggrin:

The area looked great from Apollo 15 as well:

 

 

as15-88-12005.jpg

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Moonshane    10,306

One of my favourite lunar regions. Fab.

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Piero    3,005

Sounds great John! And great picture too!  I was watching Apollo 13 (film) the other day. There is a scene when they look at the Moon through the window of the spaceship.  :)  

Edited by Piero
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jabeoo1    1,189

Cheers John, I was looking at that feature earlier (a first for me I think).  I was going to ask on here and bang, here it is in your OP. :)

Lovely sharp views in the FC-100 tonight all the way up to x200. 

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iPeace    2,455

I was out there earlier with Bjorn and this was indeed the highlight of my session. I also had great views up to 200x with the 2-4 Nagler Zoom.

I tend to get overwhelmed by the grandeur of all the lunar features and leave off looking up the names, but figured someone like John surely would comment on this one tonight.

:happy11:

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John    18,080

I love taking a look at an area of the lunar surface, then doing a bit of research in the "21st Century Atlas of the Moon" and then going back to the eyepiece armed with a little more understanding plus some further targets to check out :icon_biggrin:

 

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iPeace    2,455
20 minutes ago, John said:

I love taking a look at an area of the lunar surface, then doing a bit of research in the "21st Century Atlas of the Moon" and then going back to the eyepiece armed with a little more understanding plus some further targets to check out :icon_biggrin:

 

I like that approach. I have a couple of lunar maps on my phone and when I can tear myself away from the eyepiece (a passing cloud helps) I try to identify the features currently most striking to me. Never as easy to do as I expect. Not all features that stand out for me seem to have names, and many names are not quite memorable...

It's coming to me gradually. I have resolved more than once to make some sketches in order to fix things in my mind - hasn't happened yet. But in all, lunar observing is the most absorbing for me.

:happy11:

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Peter Drew    5,575

I've just had probably my best ever view of this region from Tenerife with my C8. I've had marginally better seeing on previous visits but tonight's conditions were the best I've experienced at this phase of the lunation. The evening started off well and just got better, Aristarchus which usually shows its "shadow bands" as broad brushstrokes of black and white, was tonight showing incredible detail on the walls and its small central peak, a bit like a mini Copernicus. Speaking of which, I returned to this due to the good seeing, although not quite as well placed as previous nights the detail was better showing many of the details photographed by the Lunar Orbiter. Adding to the memorable night was a collection of 6 craterlets on the floor of Plato where I usually struggle to see 4 and definite glimpses of my old Nemesis, the central rille in the Alpine Valley. I could probably descibe many other objects to the same level as just when I thought I'd seen it all I managed a small focusing tweak that seemed to improve the view even more, forcing me to go over them all again!. Tomorrow night's forecast isn't so promising so tonights session might well be the best of the visit.   :icon_biggrin: 

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John    18,080

Tenerife: 20 degrees C

Portishead: 3 degrees C

:cry:

 

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iPeace    2,455

Yes, the temperatures have returned to provide that extra edge to observing...

:confused2:

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Astro Imp    2,842

I enjoyed reading your report John.

I was aware this fascinating region was well placed last night but it was just too windy to tempt me out, it was a shame but stayed in and watched the Voyager programme instead.

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Mark at Beaufort    2,627

I also viewed the Moon last night. I again studied the terminator using the 21st Century Atlas of the Moon before going out with the Heritage 130P. I started out with Schiller and Schichard before moving down to Mare Humorum and viewing the Doppelmayer Rilles. Further down to Flamstead and the Ring before ending with Aristarchus and the Schroters Valley.

Fantastic night again with this little scope and the TeleVue 8-24 zoom and Baader 2.25X barlow. I would state that this book by Charles Wood gives fantastic detail and its worth planning an observing seesion noting the various features before starting out. Once out I place the book on a music stand.

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furrysocks2    718

Thursday night was my first visual on this region also, and the first decent view through my TMB II 6mm - 250x. I'm not sure how I've avoided it until now.

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Hayduke27    203
On 12/1/2017 at 04:58, Mark at Beaufort said:

I also viewed the Moon last night. I again studied the terminator using the 21st Century Atlas of the Moon before going out with the Heritage 130P. I started out with Schiller and Schichard before moving down to Mare Humorum and viewing the Doppelmayer Rilles. Further down to Flamstead and the Ring before ending with Aristarchus and the Schroters Valley.

Fantastic night again with this little scope and the TeleVue 8-24 zoom and Baader 2.25X barlow. I would state that this book by Charles Wood gives fantastic detail and its worth planning an observing seesion noting the various features before starting out. Once out I place the book on a music stand.

 

On 11/30/2017 at 16:06, John said:

I love taking a look at an area of the lunar surface, then doing a bit of research in the "21st Century Atlas of the Moon" and then going back to the eyepiece armed with a little more understanding plus some further targets to check out :icon_biggrin:

 

Based on a lot of comments I've been reading lately about this book, I just got a copy.  It arrived a few days ago and I've been going over it.  It's a really great book, and exactly what I have been searching for.  The moon is so full of targets, and not only does the book identify them but it gives a lot of explanation and reasons to target certain objects.  

 

Anyway, I am excited to be able to take advantage of more moonlit nights for some scope time.  Schroter's Valley is now high on my list of targets the next time that light is right.

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Mark at Beaufort    2,627
8 hours ago, Hayduke27 said:

 

Based on a lot of comments I've been reading lately about this book, I just got a copy.  It arrived a few days ago and I've been going over it.  It's a really great book, and exactly what I have been searching for.  The moon is so full of targets, and not only does the book identify them but it gives a lot of explanation and reasons to target certain objects.  

 

Anyway, I am excited to be able to take advantage of more moonlit nights for some scope time.  Schroter's Valley is now high on my list of targets the next time that light is right.

Well done Alex. If you not already started this list you may wish to consider the Lunar 100.

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Hayduke27    203
5 hours ago, Mark at Beaufort said:

Well done Alex. If you not already started this list you may wish to consider the Lunar 100.

I have indeed started the list!  I have already seen #1: earthshine :p

I love the idea of the Lunar 100, and now that I have this book to help me locate all the objects, I know I'll begin a checklist ;) 

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Astro Imp    2,842

Hi Alex, I've had a lot of fun tracking down the Lunar 100 features and found the thread by Doc at the top of this section very helpful.

Good luck and enjoy the challenge.

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