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27.11.17 Waxing Gibbous Moon LRGB


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Yesterday's (27.11.17) 8 day old Waxing Gibbous Moon (60% illuminated) imaged at 18:00UT using LRGB filters.

Seeing conditions were fair, with some faint fast moving cloud.

Altair Astro StarWave 102ED f/7 refractor
Altair IMX174 mono Hypercam
ZWO Mini EFW
Altair LRGB filter set

SkyWatcher AZ-EQ6 mount

Best 15% used of 1000 frames for each filter.

Captured software SharpCap 3.0 

Stacked with AutoStakkert 3.0

RGB channels combined and Lum added for sharpness, post processed with Photoshop CC 2018

Can also view on Flickr - https://flic.kr/p/21WynTP

 

27112017-Moon-LRGB.jpg

Edited by ZBOYD
added mount info
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