Jump to content

sgl_imaging_challenge_2021_2.thumb.jpg.72789c04780d7659f5b63ea05534a956.jpg

Recommended Posts

Hi I'm new here.

Briefly looking through this site, it would seem this site is geared towards discussion regarding instruments. So in advance, I apologize if this is not the appropriate forum/website for my question. And. If at all possible, might anyone link me to a website that might be better suited for me. I looked on youtube, and a few other websites and nothing concrete came up as to where the appropriate place to post might be or what it was I was observing regarding moon activity on this early morning of 11/28/2017. So here I am and once again I apologize if this is the wrong forum for my question.

 

I'll be brief. My knowledge of astronomy is very limited. Though I've always had a passion for astronomy.

My question. What exactly was I observing in regard to the moon's orbit/position/speed in which it changed?

Now, allow me to set the stage. It was roughly 12:30AM here in North East Texas on this day of 11/28/2017. On my way to the store I stopped to take a look at the night sky as I always do. The moon was roughly at a 50 degree angle above the southern tree line. Forgive my ignorance but this is the best way I can describe what I was observing. In less than one hour the moon had radically relocated to just above the western treeline. Once I got home the moon was obviously no longer visible from this viewing point. 

 I am very curious as to why the moons position changed so quickly. I've never seen this before.

Is this a common occurrence  within the moon's cycles and or time of year?

I look forward to hearing your responses. To hopefully shed light on what is seemingly a strange phenomenon to me.

Thank you in advance!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Unless the measurements were done precisely it is hard to determine the actual position in altitude and azimuth with accuracy. The moon sets in the west, and in the current phase it sets some time after midnight (was imaging it myself). The rotation of the earth didn't suddenly speed up, so I think the moon just trundled along at its usual pace in the sky. Another effect is that, just as the moon appears larger near the horizon (though not on the chip of my camera, so it is all in the mind), so too do other angles, so the apparent motion seems to be larger than when the moon is overhead

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I think Michael's reply sums it up well. The Moon actually traverses the sky slower than the background stars as its orbit moves in the opposite direction. Notice how the Moon rises later each successive night.  :icon_biggrin:

Link to post
Share on other sites

The description you give does not match with where the moon actually was for your location. I've assumed Dallas which seems NE Texas...

At 12.30am on 28th November, the Moon was only at 11 degrees above the horizon just south of West. An hour later it was on the horizon in the West.

I can only assume the timings you gave were incorrect?

IMG_4846.PNG

IMG_4847.PNG

Link to post
Share on other sites

lol thanks guys. Setting in the west sometime after midnight! interesting. So obviously nothing out of the ordinary.

 

At Stu lol wowzers what is all that. and fair enough. deep east texas which is still in the northern region of texas. texas is big so it has a lot of northern land mass. but to be more accurate Longview/Tyler area-ish. hwy 155 runs north and south. I was looking south, when the moon was in view at my house. after i killed some time at the gas station on hwy 80 that runs east and west. the moon was just above the western treeline. this all happened rather quickly to me. but kudos to all the replies

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Stargazer33
      Mare Fecunditatis and crater Langrenus. Saturation has been increased to show the different surface material/colours.
      C9.25; CGEM; ASI385MC; Baader Neodymium filter.

    • By Adaaam75
      Just a quickie,
      I took a shed load of images last night of the moon using my DSLR on my scope with the intention to stitch using Microsoft ICE but its been pulled!
      Any free software suggestions for image stitching (not stacking)?
    • By UkSpacenut
      Hey everyone. Have previously stumbled across this forum when searching for answers to questions, have finally made an account. 
      Last night I shot the moon for a couple of hours. I took around 10x3 minute videos and captured a little over 80,000 frames. My aim was to then create a lunar mosaic image but I have never done this before, and my technical ability seems to be adding to the confusion. 
      So to give some context, I used an ASI120MCS planetary camera through an 8" Skywatcher Skyliner 200p dobsonian. 
      I have read that ideally you would use a tracking mount to record sections of the moon at a time, however I sadly don't have that luxury. 
      I instead let the moon drift across the field of view and I'm pretty confident that among the 80,000 frames I have all the pieces of the moon as a whole. 
       
      What I'm now having issues with is how to break down these Avi files into frames which then can be used to create a mosaic. I need a "for dummies" guide ae thats what I'm feeling like currently. 
       
      Thank you in advance for any assistance you may be able to provide. :)
    • By Cobberwebb
      Hi everyone.
      Looks like I will get some favourable weather in the coming days, but the moon is out and full. I finally have a car so I can get away from light polluted Weymouth, and tonight I took a drive and found a great spot to shoot (see image).
      So to the point, I want to shoot Andromeda during these moonlit nights since the moon will be directly behind me. How much will it still affect my images?
      I'm still a beginner, using a Nikon Z50 and the 50-250mm kit lens @250 (F6.3), but I do have a Star Adventurer now, so I'll go out and shoot if nothing for the practice (my polar alignments have been pretty good).

    • By acr_astro
      Dear all,
      yesterday afternoon, the forecasts for the evening were good so I set up the 10" truss-tube Dobsonian on the terrace for cooling down. Actually in the evening the sky wasn't as clear as expected but the cirrostratus luckily did not harm too much. It could have been brighter but anyway ...
      So I tried my new 2x focal extender with the 10 inch scope for the first time and magnified up to 370x. Seeing was okay and I really enjoyed travelling along the terminator from Plato via Copernicus down to Clavius. For the 10"er the focal extender is really an enhancement when viewing the moon and conditions are okay: I saw much more detail in Clavius as I have ever observed before. 
      This would have been a good sketching target but finally I decided to go for a sketch of the magificient Copernicus (named after the famous Polish astronomer by Giovanni Riccioli mid of the 17th century): 
      The crater floor was still completely in darkness, one could only see the bright, round rim of this 93km wide crater. The terraced slopes were just partly in the lunar sunrise yet. Obviously the central peaks are as expected lower than the rim - they were still hidden in the darkness. The two craters north of it are Gay-Lussac A and Gay-Lussac on the way to the Montes Carpates with their eastern parts already visible.
      Here's the sketch:

      Telescope: Martini 10" f/5 truss-tube Dobsonian
      Eyepiece: Explore Scientific 6.7mm/82° with Explore Scientific 2x focal extender
      Date & Time: Jan 22nd, 2021 / 1900-2000 CET
      Location: home terrace, Dusseldorf region, Germany
      Technique: Koh-i-Noor charcoal, whitecoal and chalk blocks and pens on black sketching paper
      Size: 11"x11"
      Clear skies!
      Achim
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.