Jump to content

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_31.thumb.jpg.b7a41d6a0fa4e315f57ea3e240acf140.jpg

Recommended Posts

of all the kinds of telescopes, is there any one kind that just flat out is better or do all different kinds do different things better? I'm on the market now to buy my third scope, so i want to see if there is a "best" design, and if not, what kind of scope suits my needs. i don't do astrophotography yet, but i want to at some point. i have a honking big minivan so portability isn't big deal, and anyway my mak is very portable. i have a pretty good budget, i can spend up to $700 on this although i would like to keep it under $600 if i can. i would love specific recommendations, but i also would love just general ideas.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Hi , the best scope in my opinion is the scope that will get used. No point having a scope that is to big , to heavy to move outside or to a dark site .

But bang for buck ,then it has to be the reflector, why ? Lots of aperture for sensible money compared to other scope types?  

Link to post
Share on other sites

horses for courses, but if you was going to tie me down id agree with above, a newt of 8inch would take you a long way, but if you was interested in solar it would be a frac and for planets a smit-cass would be the tool for the job. there isn't any good allrounders because of the widefield of targets . goodluck. charl.

Link to post
Share on other sites

This will surprise some but ignoring budget I'd say that a 120ed type scope is about the best all rounder you can buy. Whilst I agree that a newt is better value for money per inch, a 5" class ed refractor will have more flexibility as it can be used for solar white light and potentially hydrogen alpha too. Also star shapes are sharper, you have (usually) a wider maximum field and there's a bit more contrast. 

To be honest though all scopes these days are great and we are truly spoilt for choice.

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, Moonshane said:

This will surprise some but ignoring budget I'd say that a 120ed type scope is about the best all rounder you can buy. Whilst I agree that a newt is better value for money per inch, a 5" class ed refractor will have more flexibility as it can be used for solar white light and potentially hydrogen alpha too. Also star shapes are sharper, you have (usually) a wider maximum field and there's a bit more contrast. 

To be honest though all scopes these days are great and we are truly spoilt for choice.

Having owned 25+ scopes over the years I'd either go for something like the above or maybe an 8" F/6 dobsonian :icon_scratch:

Another very versatile design that I have owned is a 6 inch maksutov-newtonian athough it was quite heavy for the aperture and required more cool down time than the above. At one point I owned both a 6" F/5.9 mak-newt and an ED120. They were both really great scopes but I kept the ED120 in the end because it's cool down time was faster and it's mounting requirements were more modest.

 

Edited by John
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I would forget about AP in the 1st instance.  Concentrate on grabbing a 4" refractor without worrying too much about the control of chromatic aberration (expensive to correct) with 2 or 3 plossl's to view planets, lunar & bright DSO's.  

If after a year or 2 IF your interest is still burning you will know your destiny. 

Get a copy of 'The Light Hearted Astronomer'.  Its advice I wish I could have / still do wish I could follow. 

Good luck with your choices. 

Edited by jabeoo1
  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

The simple answer to your question is 'no' there is no one design which is better than all the others. I'm a bit of a die hard refractor fan, but in your position I would probably buy a decent sized dob. With your minivan, portability is not an issue and you can presumably get it out under dark skies where it will show you some amazing sights.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Stu said:

The simple answer to your question is 'no' there is no one design which is better than all the others. I'm a bit of a die hard refractor fan, but in your position I would probably buy a decent sized dob. With your minivan, portability is not an issue and you can presumably get it out under dark skies where it will show you some amazing sights.

thats what I've been thinking. dobs are pretty simple from what i read, at least they are after you learn how to use them. I've been thinking that i want either a large reflector or a modest dob, i tried a refractor for my first scope and they just don't have the aperture i need. big aperture = more light drawn in + LP = LP strengthened, right? i live in michigan, and its not very dark in my backyard but i live near some decent sites and I'm a few hours from a IDSP (thats where i was this weekend in fact) so i can really get a lot out of a big aperture. a small aperture, however, like most refractors, doesn't do what i want it to. some day i plan to try out a better refractor than my first one, but one with a big aperture is way outside my price range. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, Some Dude With A Mak- Cass said:

... a small aperture, however, like most refractors, doesn't do what i want it to.....

What sort of thing do you want a scope to do for you ?

Your original post was rather unspecific which is why there were a wide range of suggestions I suspect.

If your priority is to get out under dark skies and explore the deep sky then aperture is what you will want. Your budget will purchase a 10" dobsonian such as the Orion Skyquest XT10 or the Zhumell Z10 so, in terms of light grasp, those would be the sorts of scope to consider for that sort of observing.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Some Dude With A Mak- Cass said:

a small aperture, however, like most refractors, doesn't do what i want it to. some day i plan to try out a better refractor than my first one, but one with a big aperture is way outside my price range. 

A small (say 4") refractor properly used under a dark sky can give lovely results, particularly for the larger objects up there like open clusters or nebulae such as the Veil.

That said, a decent aperture dob (such as the 10" suggested by John) will give you much better results on a broad range of deep sky objects. Any scope will struggle with light pollution except when viewing the moon and planets; get it to a dark site and it will show you far more.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Stu said:

The simple answer to your question is 'no' there is no one design which is better than all the others. I'm a bit of a die hard refractor fan, but in your position I would probably buy a decent sized dob. With your minivan, portability is not an issue and you can presumably get it out under dark skies where it will show you some amazing sights.

 

8 hours ago, Some Dude With A Mak- Cass said:

thats what I've been thinking. dobs are pretty simple from what i read, at least they are after you learn how to use them. I've been thinking that i want either a large reflector or a modest dob, i tried a refractor for my first scope and they just don't have the aperture i need. big aperture = more light drawn in + LP = LP strengthened, right? i live in michigan, and its not very dark in my backyard but i live near some decent sites and I'm a few hours from a IDSP (thats where i was this weekend in fact) so i can really get a lot out of a big aperture. a small aperture, however, like most refractors, doesn't do what i want it to. some day i plan to try out a better refractor than my first one, but one with a big aperture is way outside my price range. 

 

Just to clarify for Dude with Mak. A Dob is the mount the scope uses, named after John Dobson. Refractor in theory and reflector can be used on Dobson mounts, even though mostly used for reflectors. A refractor has a glass type optics lenses, and a reflector is mirror based . As I think from a previous post from the gent there was a bit of confusion over refractor/reflector?

If it's bang for buck and it's aperture you need then a quality reflector every time IMO , And this can be on a Dobson mount or some type of AZ/EQ mount . The Dobson mount is far better IMO for the bigger reflector because effective ,but sensible money 

Hope this helps☺

Link to post
Share on other sites

There is no "best scope" design. Requirements often conflict. Do you want it a) cheap for the aperture? b) portable? c) easy to use and find stuff with? d) ultimate contrast? e) large aperture? f) quick cool down? g) minimum maintenance? h) wide visual field of view?

Note that several of these desirable features totally clash. 

Edited by Cosmic Geoff
Link to post
Share on other sites

Just thinking about this slightly more....

....There is an argument that there is a preferable design at different apertures. Not a hard and fast rule and open to much debate but....

Up to around 5", refractors are of a manageable size and can give fantastic, high contrast views of anything from widefield targets to planetary and lunar.

From around 6" to 9.25", SCT and Mak designs remain relatively compact and manageable, providing significant aperture and resolution in a package that can easily be mounted on an affordable mount. Maks in the 6" to 8" range, and in my opinion the C925 is the higher end of the more portable SCTs. Excellent planetary, lunar and doubles scopes, particularly for imaging, but also very capable on the smaller DSOs. Mak-newts and other types fit in this category too. 

From 8" to 12"/14", solid tube dobsonians make a lot of sense, manageable size and excellent aperture per £. Great on a wide range of objects. Of course there are large SCTs in this range which make great observatory scopes, permanently mounted.

From 16" upwards, Truss dobsonians are transportable and able to be taken to the darkest sites to give best Deep Sky observing capabilities.

Plenty of exceptions to the above, but perhaps a starting point for deciding on a different scope type.

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, John said:

What sort of thing do you want a scope to do for you ?

Your original post was rather unspecific which is why there were a wide range of suggestions I suspect.

If your priority is to get out under dark skies and explore the deep sky then aperture is what you will want. Your budget will purchase a 10" dobsonian such as the Orion Skyquest XT10 or the Zhumell Z10 so, in terms of light grasp, those would be the sorts of scope to consider for that sort of observing.

 

living near some darker sites, and a reasonable drive to a dark sky park, i can get a lot out of a big aperture. its usually dark enough to see the pleaides naked-eye, so i want a scope that can pull in a ton of light and really make the most of a dark sky. with my mak i have gotten some good views of some of the brighter DSOs, so i want a scope that can get me even further into DSOs. my mak is very versatile and i have seen most of the planets with it, so whatever scope i get need not be good for planetary. basically what i want is a good scope that can provide good views of the brighter DSOs.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Timebandit said:

 

 

Just to clarify for Dude with Mak. A Dob is the mount the scope uses, named after John Dobson. Refractor in theory and reflector can be used on Dobson mounts, even though mostly used for reflectors. A refractor has a glass type optics lenses, and a reflector is mirror based . As I think from a previous post from the gent there was a bit of confusion over refractor/reflector?

If it's bang for buck and it's aperture you need then a quality reflector every time IMO , And this can be on a Dobson mount or some type of AZ/EQ mount . The Dobson mount is far better IMO for the bigger reflector because effective ,but sensible money 

Hope this helps☺

very much so. i really shoudlnt trust what i read on wikipedia because i was under the impression a dob had a slightly different optical design than a reflector. I'm thinking at this point the best thing for me is just the biggest dob i can buy. is that right or are there other considerations yet to be mentioned?

Link to post
Share on other sites

i looked on the orion website under dobsonians, and found the Orion Build-A-Scope IntelliScope Dobsonian Telescope and it looked like what i need but its very customizable, which IMO only improves it. are build-a-scopes worth the money, or should i buy something more mundane? it really tempting to buy a build-a-scope because i can customize it so heavily, but I'm worried something like that might be beyond my scope of knowledge at this point. i mean, just on friday i switched up refractors and reflectors, so i really have a lot to learn. but i think that if i were to buy the build-a-scope, i think i would learn a lot. is it just to soon for a scope like this or do you think i could learn to get the most out of it?

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 20/11/2017 at 20:29, Some Dude With A Mak- Cass said:

of all the kinds of telescopes, is there any one kind that just flat out is better or do all different kinds do different things better? I'm on the market now to buy my third scope, so i want to see if there is a "best" design, and if not, what kind of scope suits my needs. i don't do astrophotography yet, but i want to at some point. i have a honking big minivan so portability isn't big deal, and anyway my mak is very portable. i have a pretty good budget, i can spend up to $700 on this although i would like to keep it under $600 if i can. i would love specific recommendations, but i also would love just general ideas.

No.  Any more than is there a "best" type of car.  It depends on what you will do with it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

if i were to look back on all the scopes i ever had, (many) i would say that despite being the biggest of them all my 12 Dob was the one i used most by far, it is fairly hefty but the views assuming you have access to dark skies are fantastic.

i would go with an 8" Goto Dob, you'll love it really!

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

My first was an 8 inch F8. It was a bit too unwieldy so I think a F7 or 6 would have been better. 

Now have a C8 F10 & 10 inch F5 dob, both of which are easy to carry with guide scope & Telrad in place. 

My next scope may be a 120 ED. Uncertain about doublet (cheaper) or triplet though. F7/.5 so good not too long or short F ratio. (That Astro Physics F6 is what I wish I could afford though)

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/21/2017 at 14:32, Some Dude With A Mak- Cass said:

i looked on the orion website under dobsonians, and found the Orion Build-A-Scope IntelliScope Dobsonian Telescope and it looked like what i need but its very customizable, which IMO only improves it. are build-a-scopes worth the money, or should i buy something more mundane? it really tempting to buy a build-a-scope because i can customize it so heavily, but I'm worried something like that might be beyond my scope of knowledge at this point. i mean, just on friday i switched up refractors and reflectors, so i really have a lot to learn. but i think that if i were to buy the build-a-scope, i think i would learn a lot. is it just to soon for a scope like this or do you think i could learn to get the most out of it?

The Orion Build A-Scope Dob would seem an excellent idea if you know the exact package you want.

Do you?

Customising a scope is great. If you know what kit you want. If you don't you are kinda making a 'Guess A-Scope' and could well end up paying for accessories you don't want/need. 

TBH I would start off with a more mundane bass scope and customise it myself as my experience grew. In this way I would only be buying kit I wanted. 

Dobs are very useable in mundane bass mode ;) (and are great fun) 

Good luck with your decision :) 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Wish the UK Orion had build-a-scope. 

I would have plastic tube rather than metal or carbon fibre, my own choice of focuser, and my own choice for guide scope. Also go for a board mount probably. 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Astro_Dad
      Looking forward to receiving my 102MC in the next few days/weeks depending on supply. Does anyone have any experience, tips/advice?  Looks like a good grab and go particularity for planetary observation - interesting “next generation” mount. 
    • By Arshad Wali Muhammad
      Hi. I want to buy Celestron Evolution 9.25 with startsense. I have heard star sense isn’t avbl in 9.25 but 8.0. Is it true ? Is starsense very useful ? What’s actually is starsense is ? Because I’m not interested in 8 inch. Secondly is it better then 11 inch  CGX EQUATORIAL 1100 SCHMIDT-CASSEGRAIN TELESCOPE? If not what’s the difference in terms of object clearity ? Secondly is Celestron motorized ? I mean to say the object moves very fast, so can it track the object live ? Please advise. 


    • By lyfestyle
      Hello all, my name is Paige. I am a college student and new to the stargazing community. I know all about the constellations and astronomy, but i’ve never bought anything to see the stars up close. I’ve read through the forum and come to the conclusions I want to start with some well built binoculars and eventually get into telescopes. The 7 x 50 seem to be the common starting point but I would love to get something with a bit more clarity, and preferably still handheld.  I’ve also read up on some binoculars already and the big brands that jump out are Celestron and Orion, so I would love some opinions on those because they don’t seem to be reliable in the long run. I only have one shot on a good pair and I dont plan on buying any other equipment until i’ve mastered the binoculars! Price range up to around $300 so any tips would be amazing!
      Thank you, happy sky watching 🌌
    • By onefistinthestars
      To celebrate the 25th anniversary of Sir Patrick's DSO catalogue, I've added the available Caldwells to my basic Marathon search sequence. 
      Those interested may be pleasantly surprised by how many of the additional treasures are only a short hop from a given (or en route to the next) Messier.
      The sequence for 40°N can be found at the SEDS Messier Marathon homepage or at my blog.
      Peace, Stephen
    • By LR Watanabe
      For Deep-Sky AP of mostly galaxies (and nebulae), what'll give me the best results– a medium-weight 130 P-DS or a very lightweight wide-field WO Z61? I know the "best" telescope is one that doesn't just collect dust all day long, but I just can't figure it out. Supporting said telescope will be the SW HEQ5 PRO Synscan (with the Rowan Astronomy belt attached), which will be supported further by a autoguiding system, possibly a very lightweight CF 32mm refractor with a ZWO ASI 120mm Mini (Can't find the -S model in Japan). On the telescope'll be the Canon EOS 600D, quite a heavy beast IMO. 
       Instead of leaving it here, I'll say (just blurt out) everything I know about these seemingly-equal telescopes.
       The 130 P-DS, clocking in at F/5, will produce fantastic photos of Nebulae and Galaxies alike, although its aperture will slightly limit the galaxies it'll see. It seems this telescope does particularly well when it comes to imaging M81 or M51, and Nebulae like the Rosette. Its price-performance ratio is basically unbeatable, as it's only 250$ over here in Japan and it cranks out fantastic images. The only addition I'll need will be a F/5 SW-issued Coma Corrector; however, I don't need to worry as I'll be getting one from me mum in a few week's time.
       The William Optics Z61, which has a slightly higher F number of 5.9. It sports 2 lenses with FPL-53 elements in them, allowing for extremely high contrast images of nebulae like the Rosette, Orion, all that lot. I've previously asked a similar question, and I've been convinced by the answer that "I won't really be able to take images of galaxies other than M31, Andromeda, and M33, Triangulum. So why do I even have this as an option when I could just go with the cheaper 130 P-DS? Well because it's a wide field APO. Everything it supports, whether it be the design to the focuser, is just amazing, so much so I can't emphasise the emotion enough. 
        On Astrobin, I've checked out what kind of images these telescopes produce, and I encountered a problem– pretty much everyone was using everything but the 600D. They all used the fancy Mono-cooled CCDs like the ZWO ASI 1600MM Pro. 
       
      Clear skies,
      Leon.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.