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hi guys,

jon from dorset here! im new into the hobby although ive always had an interest of eventually getting a telescope. I am technically minded and am a aerospace engineer by trade, so i love to do a lot of design work (solidworks mainly) and cnc machining along with assembly.

i have a few other hobbies such as sea angling, metal detecting, photography............when i get the chance! my wife always says she imagines me walking around a beach with all my hobby equipment attached to me hahaha!

 

anyway back to the main question of this post!! i started looking at the skywatcher 130p, discovered a few old threads  on here regarding the 130,150,200p models. Yes i know they are going to step up in quality per model, but im asking for a honest answer if i can get pretty good pictures which each of these models? i mean i could buy the 200p and goto or dual axis motors but im not sure if that is the right choice as a newbie to the hobby and i may not even like it and quit? (just saying haha) just typical of me when i was dead set on the 130p, then i click on the model range and see the 150p and 200p and so on 

so im not looking at becoming the next best astrophotographer, i just want to be able to use my cheaper nikon d3200 to take some shots of nebula, the moon, and anything else with some striking colours

 

ps. has anyone got any side by side sample shots from each telescope please, of say nebula or the moon?

thanks if you got this far, i look forward to the replies

jon

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dobbie    171

Hi Jon if your wanting take some photos , then you should be looking at the pds range  which are more suited for astrophotography.  As for the aperture it's not that important in photography work as most people go for a lighter scope so a 130pds or 150pds is a good choice, if your wanting it for visual then the 150/200  is a better choice  either way bigger scope = bigger mount = more money, good luck which way you go,John. 

Ps welcome to the forum. 

Edited by dobbie
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alacant    1,075
1 hour ago, dorset jon boy said:

the next best astrophotographer

Hi. Get the 130 and learn the ropes. You then get the 200 and so have the best of both the wide field and single object fields of view. You can't have just one telescope anyway; it's an unwritten rule at SGL! Just make sure that the mount is capable of carrying whatever you get in future. The new belt driven EQ6r looks like a good bet.

Sorry, not very well expressed, but hoping you get the drift. Cheers and good luck.

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mikeyj1    87

Hi Jon, Welcome

Lol that image from your wife makes me laugh!

In terms of pictures, all three of those have been used to very good effect, but choose the dual speed (P-DS) version its a great improvement in usability.  Unless you have a specific need to stay small and lighter (Travel with kit or storage), then the 150pds is a great starting point. The main difference between them will be visual, you will get more detail of fainter 'stuff' with the 200pds.

But the mount is very important especially for astro-photography.  An ALT-AZ mount is easy to set up, will still let you takes simple photos, but will be limited later on because of 'Field rotation'.  If going for an Equatorial mount, EQ5 / HEQ5 minimum really.  Dual axis drives would be good, Goto makes it easier to find faint stuff, but can be frustrating for the beginner.  (there's one on here for sale today, (but check it has the counterwieghts included..)

Everyone here recommends 'Making every photon count by Steve Richards, a really good and thorough overview i must say

I see there are two other replies as i am typing this, so i will leave it there and see what the others had to say ;-)

Good luck

Mike

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thanks for the warm welcome guys

could someone please attach a side by side shot of nebula from the 130 and 200 just so i can gauge what to expect to see?

i think i may as well go with the recommendation of buying the 130p (probably with the goto) to get myself into the hobby and learn the in's and out's of looking up to the amazing sky

then i will look into upgrading once i have more experience and knowledge. Im often in the purbecks at night and this will probably be a good starting point with a smaller telescope such as the 130p. i will have a look now at the p-ds version thanks  

 

PS i forgot to add, is it straight forward to attach my nikon d3200 to the scope or do i need to buy something extra?

Edited by dorset jon boy
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Chinapig    126

To see what kind of photographs you could grab with the 130PDS, if you haven't tried it already, heave a look at this long and very impressive collection of images:

 

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rwilkey    762

You won't get 'striking colours', photos will be black, white and grey, colours come in the post-processing stage.  Get a copy of 'Making Every Photon Count' it is the bible for astrophotography.  Good luck with your choices.

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1 hour ago, Chinapig said:

To see what kind of photographs you could grab with the 130PDS, if you haven't tried it already, heave a look at this long and very impressive collection of images:

 

thank you very much

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1 hour ago, rwilkey said:

You won't get 'striking colours', photos will be black, white and grey, colours come in the post-processing stage.  Get a copy of 'Making Every Photon Count' it is the bible for astrophotography.  Good luck with your choices.

thank you will get one today, i forgot to mention im pretty good at the post processing stage, as do a lot of photography while fishing so get to see the milky way etc and the amazing purbeck jurassic coast

Edited by dorset jon boy
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1 hour ago, alacant said:

Hi. Yes. One of these and one of these. Someone is also sure to say one of these is essential too, but to answer your question the first two. HTH.

a wealth of info many thanks, much excited now to await my purchases and crack on with this! my luck it will be cloudy for the next month or so!! least i will have a certain book to keep me going! 

 

thanks to everyone, so friendly and helpful on here  (try asking a fishing forum for fishing marks/catches its a totally different type of answer haha~)

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happy-kat    3,075

The 130p, it is not an option it will not come to focus with a dslr unless you either move the primary mirror or use a barlow (which is not ideal). The 130p-ds is geared for imaging.

Your eyes need aperture to see stuff a camera does not, plenty members image with small apertures like 70mm and smaller. The mount is  important, the slightest breath and an image is ruined with shake.

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also ive noticed these models (skywatcher 130 etc etc) have been selling for a few years now, does that mean they are ungraded in anyway over the years or simply manufactured the same way they are today as when they were first on the market? thanks guys

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8 minutes ago, happy-kat said:

The 130p, it is not an option it will not come to focus with a dslr unless you either move the primary mirror or use a barlow (which is not ideal). The 130p-ds is geared for imaging.

Your eyes need aperture to see stuff a camera does not, plenty members image with small apertures like 70mm and smaller. The mount is  important, the slightest breath and an image is ruined with shake.

thank you happy-kat info noted, if i got the 130p-ds will i still need to buy extra gear for my camera to attach to it?

Edited by dorset jon boy

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happy-kat    3,075

One of these link for your camera make and then you'll need a T mount either 1.25 or 2" depending on scope chosen.

Before buying anything read and research and understand why you are choosing what you choose.

 

Edited by happy-kat
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3 minutes ago, happy-kat said:

One of these link for your camera make and then you'll need a T mount either 1.25 or 2" depending on scope chosen.

 

thanks, so im looking at the 130p ds and would the Skywatcher AZ GOTO mount be cool to go with it as a starter package to learn the ropes?

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happy-kat    3,075

Az mounts move in tiny left right up down movements, they do not follow the earth's rotation unlike an equatorial mount does.

Astroimaging the limiting factor is the mount, you choose where you can accept be it size, weight, exposure duration, cost, portability etc.

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12 minutes ago, happy-kat said:

Az mounts move in tiny left right up down movements, they do not follow the earth's rotation unlike an equatorial mount does.

Astroimaging the limiting factor is the mount, you choose where you can accept be it size, weight, exposure duration, cost, portability etc.

ok so i wouldnt be able to do any long exposure shots with that mount? my budget isnt really a problem i just didnt want to go and spend a lot of money and end up not getting into the hobby or finding it too difficult.

as for the astrophotography i have tried various shots with my nikon d3200 and have some half decent moon and milkyway shots. but if i could achieve shots like this i would be mega happy!!!

 

 

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happy-kat    3,075

That member has fine tuned and is an ace at imaging and processing. They use an equatorial mount and some of those images require that and are using a modified camera, also most of those images are mosaics of many panes.

Do you have far to move equipment from storage to setup? Are there stairs involved?

I'll see if I can fine the one member using the 130p-ds on an az mount.

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happy-kat    3,075

This member is (but I'm not sure if it is all images, thy are using the mount they already owned) link and another member is shaun_astro. Many az mounts have quite low payloads and the 130p-ds with tube rings and dove bar weighs 4.9 kilos before adding a camera.

If you already own lots of camera gear you could take a look at the skywatcher star adventurer mount and consider a telescope just for visual. Cracking images with camera and that mount on this post Link

Edited by happy-kat
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Charic    2,012

Go check out the Skyliner 200P. Its a great scope for visual observations, capable of seeing galaxies, if your skies allow, Planets too when their available.
I have the adaptors to attach a D5000 but not something I do often, and because the scope doesn't auto track, the images would get blurred easily and quickly unless its a simple shot of the Moon. For visual use, you don't need electronics, just get the biggest objective/mirror you can afford.

For any astro-photography, I would be better suited with an ED80 or an ED100  sized refractor on a suitable mount. 

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Geoff Lister    107

Welcome to SGL, from a bit further "up country".

This is my D3200, showing how T-ring and T to eyepiece adaptor replace the normal lens. The external thread on the adaptor screws into the internal thread of the ring, and the ring provides an interface that pretends to be a "dumb" lens. You need to set a slow shutter speed (many seconds) and a high ISO film sensitivity.

5a05c9973ace7_D3200withTringandadaptor.jpg.19e0417bcbf25073063e9488816d2773.jpg

You will probably need to use an additional x2 Barlow lens to get the image to focus on the camera's sensor. Some Barlow lenses have the external "T" (42mm) thread, and can be used in place of the adaptor.

Geoff

Edited by Geoff Lister
T thread size corrected to 42mm (thanks Waldemar)
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Waldemar    275

T2 = M42 thread (42 x 0,75mm). And i.m.h.o.  a T2 to 2" adapter is the better choice if it fits your focuser, to prevent vignetting with APSc size sensors

Edited by Waldemar
more clarity

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