Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

orion25

A Good Night for Uranus and Neptune!

Recommended Posts

A clear night sky and lots of free time were a recipe for a satisfying night of observing and imaging with my Mak. My imaging targets were the freshly opposed Uranus and its more distant cousin Neptune. A trick I use to find Uranus is to star hop from Hamal to Sheratan in Aries to Eta Piscium and Omicron Piscium in Pisces. Uranus is just above Omicron. This is a single 2 second exposure at ISO1600: 

59ebb5133ca55_ASTRONOMY-URANUS(PRIMEFOCUS)10-20-17CAPTION.thumb.jpg.6e4a6eb744b1366059199460ebe1ab59.jpg

Neptune was a little trickier to image as I only had the viewfinder on the scope to guide me and Neptune was undetectable through the camera. I had to point the scope in the general area that I knew Neptune was in, using Lambda Aquarii as a guidepost, and I took several test shots to look for familiar star patterns. But, I got it, using a 10 second exposure time at ISO1600:

 59ebb5bc009c5_ASTRONOMY-NEPTUNE(PRIMEFOCUS)10-20-17CAPTION.thumb.jpg.5dea0c2f42f8cdced66c2db6ef899a2e.jpg

Had a great night imaging and star chasing, and even saw an Orionid before all was said and done!

Clear skies to all,
Reggie

  • Like 9
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very nice Reggie. This is the closest I’m getting to seeing anything due to the weather so thanks for sharing 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, tooth_dr said:

Very nice Reggie. This is the closest I’m getting to seeing anything due to the weather so thanks for sharing 

Same here! I have 'wall to wall' cloud here in the Thames Valley! :clouds1::cussing: 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, tooth_dr said:

Very nice Reggie. This is the closest I’m getting to seeing anything due to the weather so thanks for sharing 

Thanks. I hope your sky clears, soon, tooth_dr. And when it does, take full advantage of it! :happy7:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice. I have been wanting to get my C9.25 on Neptune but it's just permanent cloud cover here.

Peter

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Paul73 said:

Great colours Reggie.

Thanks, Paul. I bet you can get some cracking views with that dob!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, PeterCPC said:

Nice. I have been wanting to get my C9.25 on Neptune but it's just permanent cloud cover here.

Peter

Thanks, Peter. I would love to see how Neptune would look in a C9.25!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, tooth_dr said:

‘Storm’ Brian is battering us here at present.

Oh no! Sending you positive vibes to send ol' Brian on his way so you can back out under the stars :happy7:

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very good Reggie. . What sort of Mag was that taken @ , to get the pictures. Just wondering if

I could get that , with a webcam. :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A nice job on an object difficult to fit into a  not dedicated camera!

Edited by astroavani
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/23/2017 at 09:13, Grotemobile said:

Very good Reggie. . What sort of Mag was that taken @ , to get the pictures. Just wondering if

I could get that , with a webcam. :)

Thanks. I took the pictures at prime focus, and my Nikon camera zoomed out is 18mm. The focal length of my scope is 1540mm, so that would make this about 86 magnification. You should be able to easily get pictures with your webcam.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, astroavani said:

A nice job on an object difficult to fit into a  not dedicated camera!

Thanks, Avani. Star hopping made a difficult task so much easier! Especially on Neptune. No computer, no guiders, just my viewfinder and star charts.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Hayduke27 said:

Great images!

Thanks, Alex. Neptune was a real challenge though. Star hopping helped a lot with both planets since I wasn't using a go-to or GPS to pinpoint their locations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very nice images Reggie, focus looks sharp.

Star hopping is great fun. I tend to use a mix of techniques, anything from goto through 'I know where it is so just point the scope there!' to star hopping. ;) 

I do remember having to do a fairly epic 'hop' to find Uranus once, there were no visible stars anywhere near, so SkySafari came to my rescue and we hopped all the way there :) 

Anyway, great stuff and thanks for your post.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Star hopping to find objects is good fun and all part of the challenge. Unles I'm using my GOTO mount I usually try and find a difficult object like Neptune with binoculars first. Stars very often look different visually than on a star chart or stelarium or whatever. So I familiarise myself with the arrangement of stars around the object before trying to find it though the telescope. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Stu said:

Very nice images Reggie, focus looks sharp.

Star hopping is great fun. I tend to use a mix of techniques, anything from goto through 'I know where it is so just point the scope there!' to star hopping. ;) 

I do remember having to do a fairly epic 'hop' to find Uranus once, there were no visible stars anywhere near, so SkySafari came to my rescue and we hopped all the way there :) 

Anyway, great stuff and thanks for your post.

Thanks, Stu. Focusing was another challenge. Without an autofocuser, I had to rely on my eye to get a pinpoint (or disc). So, I took several test shots to make sure everything was in focus and that my EQ drive was calibrated properly. Omicron Piscium and Lambda Aquarii are my friends :hello2:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Ouroboros said:

Star hopping to find objects is good fun and all part of the challenge. Unles I'm using my GOTO mount I usually try and find a difficult object like Neptune with binoculars first. Stars very often look different visually than on a star chart or stelarium or whatever. So I familiarise myself with the arrangement of stars around the object before trying to find it though the telescope. 

I also like to familiarize myself with the sky, especially before trying to image. And you are right, stars (and other celestial objects) can look and be positioned different from star charts and such. Omicron Piscium made finding Uranus a breeze, and Lambda Aquarii greatly simplified finding Neptune.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Geeze - how'd I miss this up 'til now?

Great stuff, Reggie! I'll be adding these to my Munsell-files I'm compiling. More on this later and over the pond. You've got the blue down in both of these this time - to my eyes.

Pouring up here in Podunk, hope you're faring better!

Dave

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Dave In Vermont said:

Geeze - how'd I miss this up 'til now?

Great stuff, Reggie! I'll be adding these to my Munsell-files I'm compiling. More on this later and over the pond. You've got the blue down in both of these this time - to my eyes.

Pouring up here in Podunk, hope you're faring better!

Dave

You didn't miss much, Dave. They're the same images as over at AC. Thanks for chiming in. Clear, cool skies down here right now. I've been getting in some serious planetarium time in, too. It's got to clear up your way some time soon, I hope! BTW, I love the Munsell chart!

Reggie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We finally had a clear night here last night (although the Moon was at 68%) so I had a go at Uranus and Neptune with the C9.25 and ASI224. The results look the same. I only managed to get the ASI to run at about 1fps in Sharpcap even with a USB3 connection. The washed out sky did not help much. The atmosphere was a bit turbulent as well. The first is Neptune (believe it or not).

Peter

neptune291017.png

uranus291017.png

Edited by PeterCPC

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, PeterCPC said:

We finally had a clear night here last night (although the Moon was at 68%) so I had a go at Uranus and Neptune with the C9.25 and ASI224. The results look the same. I only managed to get the ASI to run at about 1fps in Sharpcap even with a USB3 connection. The washed out sky did not help much. The atmosphere was a bit turbulent as well. The first is Neptune (believe it or not).

Peter

neptune291017.png

uranus291017.png

Even with a washed out sky these are some great colorful images. They look almost the same, Neptune a bit bluer. Thanks for posting these, Peter!

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Xilman
      At long last I have managed to image Caliban, also known as Uranus XVI. It is a small (circa 72km) outer satellite of Uranus which was discovered in September 1997 using the Hale 5m telescope at Palomar. Incidentally, Sycorax (U-XVII)was discovered in the same observing session.  That satellite is around 1.7 magnitude brighter and so much easier to observe.
      Although a  three hours exposure, unfiltered for maximum sensitivity, was used the signal to noise ratio is barely 3 and serious image processing was needed to produce a relatively clear image. Even so, it is not especially obvious. The reason is that the MPOC ephemeris predicts that the satellite has a magnitude of 22.2 at the time of observation. More information is available at http://www.astropalma.com/Projects/Satellites/caliban.html
       

    • By Lucas_M
      Hi all,
      This is my third Uranus capture this season. I am much happier with this result.
      The seeing helped a lot and the sky quality was favorable.
      This image is the result of 5 de-rotated videos on Winjupos, all captured with IR742 filter. The result was used as luminance in the composition. RGB came from a normal color capture.
      Following the images of other friends, we can notice the atmospheric activity on the planet. It seems to be changing every week. Many changes can still happen until the opposition.
       
      Lucas Magalhaes

    • By J47
      Hello stargazers, welcome. I had posted a picture yesterday of Uranus that had appeared to show its rings. I am using a Nexstar 4se, a 2x Barlow, and my Neximage Burst Color and capturing hundreds of photos and stacking them for my results. But still had me and others curious to if I were actually seeing the rings of Uranus or maybe just a glare of some sort.
      So I got back out there this morning, might I note I live in FL where the weather tends to stay hot so clear imaging during this time of year can be difficult, but not impossible as this image that I stacked 150 out of 300 images taken may show that statement holds true..............or I could just be mistaken the object in the image, but all in all I am feeling pretty confident that I have a decently clear image(stacked 150 images) of Uranus, its rings, and one of it's distant moons. It may be necessary to zoom in on my photo in order to see the moon it should be down and to the right of the planet a good distance in relation to the size of planet, I noticed that looking at Uranus in the photo helped bring the moon out just like stargazing in real-time. 
      If anyone can better distinguish what I might have done right or wrong here any help would be appreciated (also forgot to change format save for my images so I am stuck with .bmp and setting it as a download, sorry for any inconvenience.) - - - J47(JAY)
      uranusringmoon.bmp
    • By J47
      Hi everyone I managed to wake up early this morning and get a great image processed using Registax6.1 of Uranus. I am new to astrophotography but enjoying every second of it. I have a Nexstar 4se that I used to capture these images with also increased my zoom by using a 2x Barlow. Only through my Neximage Burst Color (in which was used to take the images) was I able to make out to hazy blue planet best. Using iCap2.4 software for capturing the images heres what I did.....
      - Images taken and processed September 4, 2019 around 5:00 A.M.- 5:30 A.M.
      - decreased the gain to around 330-380 while exposure was set to 27 fps
      - adjusted my focus
      - took 200 frames at 25 fps
      Continuing to Registax I processed the images only using the best frames out of 100, I added a few prefilters: BLUR was adjusted slightly to around 10-15, SMOOTH was decreased by around 5, and contrast prefilter, forget what it was called, was reduced to .90. 
      I tuned the wavelets until the hazy spot between the rings and planet were no longer visible and the difference with the rings and planet begin to appear. Here's the results hope they are as cool to everyone else, as I find it amazing my 4se can see that much into detail.
      uranus-rings.bmp
    • By BinocularSky
      The latest edition of the Binocular Sky Newsletter is ready. As well as the usual overview of DSOs, variable and double stars, this month we have:
      * Asteroid occultation of a bright star
      * Neptune appulse with bright star
      * Vesta getting easier
      * Three Mira stars near maximum
      This should be enough to keep you gainfully occupied with your binoculars or small telescope. To pick up your free copy, just head over to http://binocularsky.com and click on the Newsletter tab, where you can subscribe (also free, of course) to have it emailed each month, and get archived copies. 

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.