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Alpha Persei Cluster in Perseus

Nikon D5300
60 x 4 seconds
70mm @ f / 4.8
ISO 3200

20 darks, 20 offsets. One day I'll learn how to do flats.

Seriously challenging conditions last night with high winds and a great deal of intermittent cloud, despite the forecast of clear skies. Nevertheless I'm quite happy with this

Cluster-1.jpg

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I have a soft spot for clusters.  Nicely done with lovely round stars.  I'd like to see a bit more colour in some of the stars (I see hints of orange coming through.....)

 

Flats are *very* worthwhile if you get vignetteing (ie darker edges/corners)  I just point the scope at a clean blue sky then zap of 20 or so shots in A mode using the same ISO as my night shots, histogram nearly at the middle).   That said, your pic doesn't show much vignetting.  Is it a crop?

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It is yes. Tried pushing the saturation a bit but couldn't do it without it blowing them and ruining it. Need to get some more data I think to bring that colour out more. Only just starting to discover clusters for myself and getting pretty excited about them ūüėä

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