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alhiggs

does anyone have tips on how to find andromeda galaxy

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Doc    104

Find the square of Pegasus and look for the upper left star called Alpheratz then left to 31 Andromeda then left again to Mirach. Then up two stars pass 35 and 37 Andromeda. Then just to right above 37 Andromeda you will find a large oval smudge that is M31.

 

 

 

 

Edited by Doc

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Floater    2,154

Also, the ‘arrow’ comprising Caph, Shedar and Navi, in Cassiopeia (right hand side of the ‘W’), points in the general direction of Andromeda.

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cfpendock    450

As Gordon says above, I find the W of Cassioepeia.  I use the arrow formed by the three stars of the right of the W to find Mirach (which is pretty bright), and then work up using the other two fainter stars:

Hope this helps

Chris

new-1.jpg.3afd9f1bd91e6b3d6b88877d8849346c.jpg

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Sky-J    15

I'm new here so sorry if I'm treading on any toes but adding to the above, I find a good way to find M31 is to find the 2 stars in the I've circled in the Andromeda constellation (pic attached) and jump out by the same distance again. It'll make sense in the pic.  

Regarding what you'll see in binoculars depends on the binoculars and skies. With 10x50s you'll see a nice elongated fuzzy ball, with 15x50's you'll start to get a bit more shape and with dark skies and a good pair of 15x70's (supported) the view is wonderful, it actually appears as a galaxy. This was one of the experiences that got me hooked on astronomy, so when you've found it, don't forget to share it!

606px-Andromeda_IAU.svg.jpg

Edited by Sky-J
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Stu    14,455

I think we are all saying basically the same thing here which is great. I find this map spells it out very clearly. I find M31 in a few seconds with hop number 2.

IMG_4320.JPG

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John    17,140

Turn the other way at Mirach, go a similar distance "downwards" in (Stu's piccy) and you can find M33 (the Triangulum Galaxy) with binoculars on a dark night. Somewhat fainter than M31 but quite a large patch even in 11x70's :icon_biggrin:

Edited by John
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alhiggs    42
1 hour ago, Sky-J said:

I'm new here so sorry if I'm treading on any toes but adding to the above, I find a good way to find M31 is to find the 2 stars in the I've circled in the Andromeda constellation (pic attached) and jump out by the same distance again. It'll make sense in the pic.  

Regarding what you'll see in binoculars depends on the binoculars and skies. With 10x50s you'll see a nice elongated fuzzy ball, with 15x50's you'll start to get a bit more shape and with dark skies and a good pair of 15x70's (supported) the view is wonderful, it actually appears as a galaxy. This was one of the experiences that got me hooked on astronomy, so when you've found it, don't forget to share it!

606px-Andromeda_IAU.svg.jpg

your not treading on feet your pic and advice  much apreciated at the end of the day we all have to start somewhere 

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Chefgage    155

Similar to what has been said. I use cassiopeia to point to mirach. I then put mirach at the bottom of the field of view and that then gives me a backward L comprising of 45and, uAnd and mirach as shown below

 

Screenshot_20171017-153231.png

I then bring uAnd to the bottom of the field of view and then Andromeda will be top right of the field of view as shown below.

The outer blue circle represents my binoculars field of view.

 

Screenshot_20171017-153628.png

Edited by Chefgage
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Pete Presland    7,588

Follow all the advice above and you can not miss it. Make sure you eyes are adapted dark to the dark, you will so much more of the night sky once you have been outside for a while.

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alhiggs    42
1 hour ago, Pete Presland said:

Follow all the advice above and you can not miss it. Make sure you eyes are adapted dark to the dark, you will so much more of the night sky once you have been outside for a while.

well I spotted it folks thanks you all for your help and advice 

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Sky-J    15

Great work!

When looking at the Andromeda Galaxy through binoculars, I always like to remind myself of a paragraph I read in the excellent book, Binocular Highlights: 99 Celestial Sights for Binocular Users by Gary Seronik. Which is, the little fuzzy ball of light you see represents the combined light from over a trillion stars that has travelled more than 2 and a half million light years to reach your binoculars. Imagine what we look like from there...

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Scott    4,656
On 10/15/2017 at 23:33, Stu said:

I think we are all saying basically the same thing here which is great. I find this map spells it out very clearly. I find M31 in a few seconds with hop number 2.

IMG_4320.JPG

i use #2

 

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alhiggs    42
4 hours ago, Sky-J said:

Great work!

When looking at the Andromeda Galaxy through binoculars, I always like to remind myself of a paragraph I read in the excellent book, Binocular Highlights: 99 Celestial Sights for Binocular Users by Gary Seronik. Which is, the little fuzzy ball of light you see represents the combined light from over a trillion stars that has travelled more than 2 and a half million light years to reach your binoculars. Imagine what we look like from there...

I love history and when your seeing.the.light from 2.5 millions years ago can't get better that

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