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Mangleworsle    33
2 minutes ago, davyludo said:

Yeah...sorry, but I have no idea what that is. Now you've given me something else to go away and read about! :tongue2:

Just for your info - here is an idea of the difference in view between the SLV 12mm and the BST 15mm (on M42).

image.thumb.png.e0a286a91440db3318cf504c170c9ce2.png

I can see the need for the 15mm, ooh dear, I fear wallet emptying very quickly.:)

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Alfian    1,012
21 hours ago, Ben the Ignorant said:

Mangleworsle, don't be stuck in the past with 50° eyepieces

I'm not so sure that labeling 50 degree EPs as "stuck in the past" is fair. A quality EP of 50 degrees will have its place and shine accordingly. A 25mm Vixen SLV in 102 f4.9 refractor would give 20x @ 2.5 degrees which is fairly wide is most peoples eyes. The ES 24/68 is a good EP and will give 21x @ 3.2 degrees and is plenty enough for most purposes. Much more than that and binoculars will give a more satisfying wide field view. I find a 68 degree as much as I find comfortably useful and 50 - 60 degrees good but ultimately its down to preferences and everyone will differ as to what works for them.

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davyludo    192
20 minutes ago, Alfian said:

I'm not so sure that labeling 50 degree EPs as "stuck in the past" is fair. A quality EP of 50 degrees will have its place and shine accordingly. A 25mm Vixen SLV in 102 f4.9 refractor would give 20x @ 2.5 degrees which is fairly wide is most peoples eyes. The ES 24/68 is a good EP and will give 21x @ 3.2 degrees and is plenty enough for most purposes. Much more than that and binoculars will give a more satisfying wide field view. I find a 68 degree as much as I find comfortably useful and 50 - 60 degrees good but ultimately its down to preferences and everyone will differ as to what works for them.

The largest I have used is 68 degrees - I get the feeling that you would need to move your head/eye around to be able to see more if you went for a higher afov. Maybe I'm misunderstanding something but I got the feeling with the 68 degrees that it was a sweet spot. 

The 60 degrees is a nice balance for me....although I love my SLV :biggrin:

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Stu    14,455
1 hour ago, davyludo said:

If you're looking more wide-field, then I would consider what others have said about the 68 degree eyepieces. I think 24mm @ 68 degrees is as far as you can go with a 1.25" barrel - sure someone more experienced can confirm, or correct me if I'm wrong. 

That's correct, a 24mm 50 degree, 32mm 50 degree and 40mm 42/43 degree all give around the maximum field in 1.25" format.

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Alfian    1,012
Just now, davyludo said:

The largest I have used is 68 degrees - I get the feeling that you would need to move your head/eye around to be able to see more if you went for a higher afov. Maybe I'm misunderstanding something but I got the feeling with the 68 degrees that it was a sweet spot. 

The 60 degrees is a nice balance for me....although I love my SLV :biggrin:

Once you get above 68/70 degrees you tend to get the "port-hole" effect where you are gazing around the fov to take it in. For some thats no problem at all and indeed I have an 82 degree EP, its a matter of choice.

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Mangleworsle    33

Thanks gentlemen, as I read your comments I am learning about what to consider when buying a new eyepiece and above all else how much learning I must do.

If it had not been for you and others on this site who have helped in the past few months I would have made some really bad decisions.

Thank's to all.

Jim

Edited by Mangleworsle
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davyludo    192
34 minutes ago, Alfian said:

Once you get above 68/70 degrees you tend to get the "port-hole" effect where you are gazing around the fov to take it in. For some thats no problem at all and indeed I have an 82 degree EP, its a matter of choice.

Ahhh, that's what people mean by "porthole". Everyday is a school day! 

Thanks Ian :thumbsup:

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Louis D    760
2 hours ago, Mangleworsle said:

I doubt I'll ever be able to afford a Panoptic, but I should be able to get something.

Give it 20 years or more.  Starting out in my 20s with a new family, money was tight, and I couldn't afford any sort of telescope.  Now, mid-career and empty nesting, I drop $400 on an eyepiece without thinking twice.  Don't sell your future earnings potential short.  You'll get there, just be patient and work hard.

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Alfian    1,012
2 hours ago, Mangleworsle said:

Thanks gentlemen, as I read your comments I am learning about what to consider when buying a new eyepiece and above all else how much learning I must do.

If it had not been for you and others on this site who have helped in the past few months I would have made some really bad decisions.

Thank's to all.

Jim

When you put it like that I think charting your way through astronomy as a hobby is a bit like adolescence (well not entirely fortunately!) in as much that its a voyage of discovery where no matter what you think is a good idea, some mistakes are inevitable but hopefully not too costly!  Its a steep learning curve sometimes but as you say, there is lots of useful advice and good wishes to be found here.

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Mangleworsle    33
19 hours ago, Alfian said:

When you put it like that I think charting your way through astronomy as a hobby is a bit like adolescence (well not entirely fortunately!) in as much that its a voyage of discovery where no matter what you think is a good idea, some mistakes are inevitable but hopefully not too costly!  Its a steep learning curve sometimes but as you say, there is lots of useful advice and good wishes to be found here.

That sums up my journey beautifully Alfian. :thumbsup:

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Mangleworsle    33
21 hours ago, Louis D said:

Give it 20 years or more.  Starting out in my 20s with a new family, money was tight, and I couldn't afford any sort of telescope.  Now, mid-career and empty nesting, I drop $400 on an eyepiece without thinking twice.  Don't sell your future earnings potential short.  You'll get there, just be patient and work hard.

I love your optimism, but I am a bit old too give it a 20 year wait.

I have just returned to astronomy after 20+ years without a telescope, and it's amazing how much things have changed. Equipment that would be completely out of reach are now considered everyday items.

Thanks again.

Jim :clock:

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Alfian    1,012
3 hours ago, Mangleworsle said:

I have just returned to astronomy after 20+ years without a telescope, and it's amazing how much things have changed. Equipment that would be completely out of reach are now considered everyday items.

I had my interest re-kindled almost 6 years ago by the surprise present of a telescope, what a "ride" since! Regarding your latter comment, I recently bought a book on astronomy from a charity shop, it was about 25 years old but most it still very relevant and good to read. However the section on equipment choice was revealing both in terms of what was available and prices. In terms of whats available now and relative affordability we appear to be living in a bit of a golden age.

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Mangleworsle    33
4 hours ago, Alfian said:

I had my interest re-kindled almost 6 years ago by the surprise present of a telescope, what a "ride" since! Regarding your latter comment, I recently bought a book on astronomy from a charity shop, it was about 25 years old but most it still very relevant and good to read. However the section on equipment choice was revealing both in terms of what was available and prices. In terms of whats available now and relative affordability we appear to be living in a bit of a golden age.

You are so right Kelner's at that time were top of of the tree and you could forget about imaging unless you had a very healthy bank account. :)

Oh what a joy it has become.

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John    17,140

When I started out in the early 1980's the Plossl was the "big deal" eyepiece. The Vixen ones (Japanese) were considered the best things around along with the smooth sided Tele Vue's. Imports from Taiwan, China and Russia had not started in any quantity back then. My 1st quality eyepieces were 3 Tele Vue plossls bought in a sale for £50 apiece from a dealer in Birmingham - the 7.4mm, 13mm and 21mm. I was so proud of them !

Now the market is awash with choices from 40 degree orthos to 120 degree hyper wide angles.

 

Edited by John
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Mangleworsle    33

It really is surprising,  but that said it is really good  to see that the quality particularly in the mid range has given good equipment at a moderate budget. It's helping me to get back into astronomy without my wife giving me a hard time like she did before. :happy11:

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Louis D    760
On 10/13/2017 at 06:59, Mangleworsle said:

I picked up an eyepiece projection unit a while back, have yet to try it,

Have you had any experience in this area?

Typically, you insert a narrow eyepiece in the unit, attach a camera via a T-ring above it to the outside of the unit, adjust the distance between the eyepiece and camera via the unit to achieve your desired magnification and ability to reach focus.  At some point you have to focus the assembled unit with the main focuser until you get a sharp image in the camera viewfinder.

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