Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

EBXL5

Hello.......again!

Recommended Posts

So as per the title it's a hello again!

Apologies I've been gone a while (2yrs) due to work commitments and moving home. 

After visits to the Kennedy Space Centre this summer and having just returned from the National Space Centre in Leicester (kids sleepover party), I dusted off my trusty little Dob and managed to get some fantastic views of Saturn for the family and even watched the ISS go by. 

Astro fun reinvigorated, clear skies fellow loungers. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Victor Boesen said:

Welcome back! Must be fun to look through a telescope again after such a long time!

Indeed it was. A quick realignment of the RDF and all good again.

That being said I'd love to not have to do the "nudge" and would like a tracking setup. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome back from land down under

Know all about the nudge when using dob

Club belong to goes into schools, as well as space badge scout/guide movement, and when have 20+ kids lined up to view Saturn and Jupiter, have to keep checking scope alignment with nudge after every couple of kids been through

Have a ED80 on EQ5 mounts, and takes about 30 minutes to do 2 star polar alignment, inn mean time have 20+ 5yo's lined up to observe above us, and the dob is quicker setting up, as 5yo's do become impatient

Glad you able to enjoy with your family and friends

 

John

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Greetings and welcome back to the fold!

Many changes over the years - yet the stars remain roughly the same,

Dave

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello and welcome back to the community, see you around the forums.

Clear Sky's.  Enjoy.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Victor Boesen
      Yesterday I managed to climb out of bed at a little past 3:30AM to get my small portable rig out to a small nearby park and setup to observe Jupiter, Saturn and Mars. I got the Skywatcher Evostar 72ED DS-Pro last summer so I was especially excited to see how it would perform on Mars because of its red wavelengths which many small fracs often have trouble with handling.
      At first it was partly cloudy but I persisted and was out and setup on the field at around 4AM. The sky was already surprisingly bright here in Denmark but Jupiter was shining bright and Saturn faintly visible almost right besides Jupiter. Fortunately for me it wasn't too cold, but I was happy I brought some gloves anyways;)

      This picture was taken at 5AM while I was observing Mars.
      I remember from last year that my scope didn't perform great on Jupiter for some reason, and the view of the gas giant wasn't anything different this time either. Using my 4.7mm ES 82 degree eyepiece not much detail visible except the two main bands and its moons. I would later return to Jupiter after the scope had cooled down a little and the view was perhaps a little sharper.
      Pointing the scope at Saturn, which I was very satisfied with last year, I was amazed of the detail the small scope managed to squeeze out. It doesn't compare to the view I had last year with my 10" dob under great conditions at 255X but I was able to easily spot surface banding on the planet itself, and the Cassini division was also surprisingly stable. I really enjoy the stable and consistent view through the small refractor! I observed Saturn for quite a while until I eventually set out to try to find Mars. At this point I couldn't even see Saturn with the naked eye but I was fortunate that Saturn and Mars were approximately the same elevation above the horizon.
      After a few sweeps across where I though Mars would be I finally located the small red speckle, this time with my 6.7mm eyepiece so I had a larger FOV. Switching to the 4.7mm, though still very small, I was surprised that I could pick up a dark surface marking across the disk on the lower southern half of the disk. Furthermore, the southern polar cap was really pronounced and you couldn't miss it. I watched Mars drift through the FOV until about 30 minutes after sunrise where the contrast between the planet and the sky became too low and the dew started to set on the lens element.
      Using my small refractor for observing the planets I have always wanted to magnify things a little bit more, and I think the telescope would have no problem doing so. A Nagler zoom 3-6mm has been on my wish-list for a couple of years now, but the upcoming planet season really makes me want to find one second hand
      Here's a video I've made that covers what I've written above with some footage I tried capturing through the eyepiece:
      I hope everyone on here is still doing well despite the current situation!
      Clear skies!
      Victor
    • By mikeyscope
      This planetary grouping from 20th March around 5.30am shows Saturn to the left with conjunction of Jupiter above & Mars below, sharp eyed may also see...  Io, Ganymede & Callisto in a string just right of Jupiter.
      Image taken from Lesmahagow, South Lanarkshire looking toward the SE.
      Pentax K1 / Pentax 67  165mm lens / Exp. 2 secs @f8 / iso 200
      Ioptron tracker at siderial.

    • By Piero
      I'm currently on my annual leave in Italy and the sky has been clear all day with no air turbulence.
      The telescope is out - of course - and I managed a session before dinner.
      I thought about sharing some photos taken with my phone and a couple of sketches.
       


       



       
       
       
    • By Vroobel
      Hi, 
      As my GoTo is successfully finished (some cosmetic issues remain) I shoud focus my attention on planets' positions. I have proper source of information: fantastic book "Astronomical Algorithms" by Jean Meeus, thus I will sort the planets soon. But planets are not a challenge for me at this moment, they are just something obvious to do in my list. 
      I have another idea and ambitious plan for next project within the year: locating and tracking the ISS to be able to make a video of its fly, not only transition. 
      Similarly to other objects, I need some equations. I'm pretty sure they are available somewhere, because plenty websites or apps offer showing current position of the ISS. 
      I will use this topic for sharing a progress ot the project. 
    • By MarsG76
      Saturn imaged on 17 August 2019 using a C8 SCT, Skyris 618C at f33.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.