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Staffs Oatcake

Moved House just finding my bearings.

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I've been absent for the forums for a while as I packed up my telescope with an impending house move.  Which has now taken place and the telescope will be retrieved from safe storage.  However a few nights ago I sat out in my new garden looking at the night sky.  I grabbed my trusty Canon 40d and set up my tripod.   Attached are some of the images taken.   

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Time of night, length of exposure? Beautiful, clear skies, in the first, the Milky Way is just beginning to show. I've had those for a couple of nights, now, but full Moon has spoiled much of any chance to see deep-sky.

Your second image (showing Cassiopeia) is much like my view from the barnyard behind my home, with trees blocking a portion of my NE view. My view is a bit further south than yours, though. I'm at 35 degrees, instead of 52, so time of night would be very different to get that particular alignment.  I have to wait until early AM this time of year to get M31 high enough to get it out of the light-polluted lower sky around me. Most other things as well. Do you get that dark a sky all the time?

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Hope  you settle well in your new home.   Can be traumatic moving house, so hopefully any induced stress has dissipated.   One big bonus you have illustrated in your post, excellent night skies.  Lovely Jubbly.  We can look forward to more Images in future.        

Best Wishes, hope you and yours have a great and happy life in your new home.

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Captured the attached this morning on my Android phone as leaving for work

Full moon setting around 4-30am over the ranges adjacent to my home Goldcoast Hinterland 

 

 

Moon setting over Tamborine.jpg

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Picture No. 1: To the left, Cassiopeia just above the tree tops, above Cepheus with the nicely displayed pinkish-red Garnet Star (Mu Cep); to the right: Cygnus, with star clouds of the Milky Way.

Picture No. 2: again Cassiopeia and Cepheus; the Double Cluster just above the trees in the middle; Kemble's Cascade to the left of it visible.

Picture No. 3: the south-western part of Pegasus; the globular M 15 can be spotted; to the right, the "Job's Coffin" asterism of Delphinus.

Picture No. 5: again the Cassiopeia - Cepheus region.

Seems to be a fairly dark spot you've chosen - a good hunting area for your 8"; enjoy the views!

Stephan

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Congrats on the move. I did the same about 3.5 yrs ago and swear i will never do it again. The stress of it all (legal paperwork etc) just aint really worth it. I was so stressed that i locked up the old house and dropped the keys into the estate agents and drove to the new house and then and only then did i realize i had left something very important in the old house...................

MY DOG.

Thankfully the new owners are also dog lovers and they looked after her until i went back the same day to collect her. They thanked me for the bottle of bubbly i had left there for them, but said "you can keep the dog".

Haha........i even left a 32" Sony Trinitron TV (big back) there, because i tried to sell it online, but no takers and i didnt need/want it and was too heavy to chuck in the skip.

In saying all of this i do love the location i am in now (and so does the dog). Im just about 30 miles west of Dublin city (but in a different county). Very much a rural location with mile upon mile of open county within 5 minutes walking distance to my north,west and east. Skies are a lot darker here (even in my own garden) than where i used to live (about 20 miles south of Dublin city.........a mile or so from the beach). 

Your view looks good. Nice and wide and open. Hard to tell just how dark your skies are without any details of the images you posted.

Enjoy your new life up there in Staff.

Here's a snap of my new "Castle":

 

 

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Edited by LukeSkywatcher
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iso1600 18-200mm canon lens at 18mm f3.5 and exposures of around 20-30 seconds.    But the 40D has now being joined by a 77D.  

We're lucky in that we are at the end of a private road and there is no street lights close to us.  The property is surrounded on three sides by open fields.   The view to the north can get light polluted as that looks over the town.  I hope to create a pier to mount the telescope on. I'll keep you updated on its progress. 

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Well ran the 77D out the other morning.  Images are taken at around 15 secs at f3.5-f8. And between 3200 and 6400iso. Not the clearest of nights when the images were reviewed, but the sky appeared clear to the naked eye.   I tried to focus more on Orion as this cluster is prominent to my southern aspect.  

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On 22 October 2017 at 22:11, cletrac1922 said:

Strange seeing Orion other way round

 

Excuse my ignorance, but I assume he stands on his head in Australia.   Just something I'd not thought about until just.  

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2 hours ago, Staffs Oatcake said:

Excuse my ignorance, but I assume he stands on his head in Australia.   Just something I'd not thought about until just.  

The orientation of objects in the sky is reversed in the Southern hemisphere (from the perspective of someone living north of the equator), so Orion is upside-down there and Sirius is placed above it high in the sky. Here it is below Orion and never rises too high. Have a play around of Stellarium to see for yourself.

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20 hours ago, spaceman_spiff said:

The orientation of objects in the sky is reversed in the Southern hemisphere (from the perspective of someone living north of the equator), so Orion is upside-down there and Sirius is placed above it high in the sky. Here it is below Orion and never rises too high. Have a play around of Stellarium to see for yourself.

Ill be checking it out later.  But it makes perfect sense.  

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14 hours ago, Staffs Oatcake said:

Ill be checking it out later.  But it makes perfect sense.  

Orion is also referred to as saucepan Southern Hemisphere

 

Link Heavens-Above http://www.heavens-above.com/skychart2.aspx?lat=-27.92023&lng=153.29898&loc=Oxenford&alt=0&tz=UCTm10

 

 

Orion.jpg

Edited by cletrac1922

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