Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_globular_clusters_winners.thumb.jpg.13b743f39f721323cb5d76f07724c489.jpg

Recommended Posts

So i was browsing amazon de and i found a telescope thats incredibly cheap.A meade 8 inch goto.It retails for 2000 euros but its selling FOR FREAKING 350 EUROS.Somebody is really trolling or the telescope is completely broken although it says its like new.I can give the link if you want to see it.Imagine if the telescope is in great condition and if the seller is trusted.I would kill myself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it looks too good to be true then......

Plenty of scope scams on eBay, often Tak, Meade or AstoPhysics. Expensive scopes with a start price of 0.99p and no reserve. They are also usually an email address requesting direct contact so they can bypass PayPal security etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The normal selling price of astro equipment, if it is in good, working, condition is somewhere between 50% and 70% of the new price.

If a 2000 Euros scope is being advertised for 350 Euros then it's either a scam of some sort or the scope is damaged or non-operational in some important ways.

 

 

Edited by John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After being scammed a few years ago by someone on another astro site who said they sold 'genuine' Meade spares, as I needed a replacement back-end for my ETX 105 that got damaged in a freak accident. When I made enquiries the seller appeared genuine, so I paid the agreed sum and he said it would be delivered by courier in two weeks. Two weeks went past and never showed up. I emailed and asked for courier details etc. Contacted the courier and they had no record. Re-emaied the seller again and he said there was some mistake and if I still wanted the part it would have to pay him again, (I had a sms/text to say he did receive the money sent), as he never received payment and he would personally deliver it. Sent the same sum of money again. Waited four weeks this time before emailing him again. He replied that his mother-in-law was dying, the wife was away and he was looking after the kids at home etc. 

I sought legal advice to reclaim the monies sent. I had sent him almost the same amount as a new ETX. Because I did it through a money transfer company rather than PayPal, there was was nothing I/they could do.

BTW#1 - the part never did show up.

BTW#2 - my ETX 105 now looks like this...IMG_0385.JPG.5061fa1a4073478117544c4770b199ed.JPG

after consulting a few local engineering workshops to make a backplate... and it was cheaper than the 'genuine' replacement part.

The moral of this story is... I would think very carefully.

Edited by Philip R

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would write to them and also to Amazon to check on your protection should you wish to buy it. It must be important to Amazon that you can't get scammed. Also check out the protection you get paying by credit card or paypal. Maybe I'm a stupid optimist.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Amazon make it clear they cannot be held responsible for 3rd party sales..... follow your gut instinct and give it a miss ? Alternatively you can send me the 350 euros.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By orfest
      [A few more photos are in the imgur album]
      Made this telescope for observing sunspots. The Sun gets projected onto a piece of paper after bouncing from 3 mirrors inside the frame.

      It's compact, light, takes only a few seconds to point at the Sun, and sketching sunspots is as easy as circling the spots on a piece of paper.

      It can even project the Moon:

      The design is inspired by a commerically available telescope, but I’ve done all the designing myself, just for the fun of it.
      Sunspotter is full of little details that make it interesting. How do you fix the eyepiece in the exact place where it needs to be? How do you keep the lens in place and perfectly aligned?
      Building the telescope was a lot of fun, I’ve learned to use a jigsaw, X-Carve and a 3D printer. The plan is to use it to complete the Astroleague Sunspotter Observing Program, but unfortunately I completed it at the minimum of a Sun cycle, and won’t see any sunspots until next year.
       
      Telescope parameters:
      Magnification: 75x Size: 41cm x 41cm x 15cm Weight: 1kg Design: Keplerian Projection size: 75mm Materials needed:
      Lens: Ø52mm f=750mm achromatic doublet Mirrors: 1, 2, 3 Eyepiece: Baader 10mm ortho 1.5m² of 10mm plywood Wooden glue 5m of PLA filament 12 nails Compressed air Isopropyl alcohol Tools I used:
      Jigsaw with a 30° bevel capacity X-Carve 1000 3D printer A laser pointer Clamp Learned modelling basics in:
      LibreCAD Easel TinkerCAD Fusion 360  
      Part 1: Choosing the lens
      The idea of a sunspotter is that the light goes through the lens, travels inside the telescope, bouncing from 3 mirrors, enters an eyepiece and the image gets projected on one of its sides.
      The distance the light travels before entering an eyepiece is the focal length and it determines the size of the telescope.
      I chose a Ø52mm f=750mm achromatic double. Observing the Sun doesn’t require a large aperture, 50mm is more than enough. I wanted a high magnification and went for the longest focal length I could find, which was 750mm. Achromatic doublet design is what people use in refractors. If it is good enough for a refractor, it’s definitely good enough for my project.
       
      With the focal length chosen I could design the wooden parts. A drawing showed that the frame needed to have sides 30cm long, but I wasn’t sure about the placement of the mirrors and went for 31cm sides, planning to shorten the light path as needed by adjusting mirror positions.
      This is the LibreCAD drawing of the layout of parts on a piece of plywood:

      Part 2: Building the base
      Having a drawing of the base in LibreCAD, I printed the drawing 1:1 scale on multiple A4 sheets of paper and glued them together. I transferred the drawing to a piece of cardboard and cut it out.

      Applied this cardboard template to the sheet of plywood, and cut out two parts with a jigsaw.. I’m not an experienced user of jigsaw, and couldn’t manage to cut half-circles accurately enough. Even worse was that the two parts were very different. I didn’t want the frame to randomly tilt left or right when adjusting its altitude, and had to spend a lot of time with sandpaper to make the halves as similar as I could.
       
      Glued the two large parts with three small parts in the middle. Additionally nailed the parts and the base was ready.
       
      Part 3: Frame
      The frame is simply a triangle made of three pieces, with short sides cut at a 30° angle. Most jigsaws can cut at 45°, but not at 30°. Had to buy a new jigsaw with a 30° bevel capacity.
      Cut out three sides, cut short sides at a 30° angle, but didn’t put them together just yet.
      The lens needs to be perfectly aligned with the Sun-facing part of the frame, otherwise the Sun projection isn't circular but elongated.
      My solution was to carve a hole with a little step as shown on the image.

      The inner hole is Ø46.5mm, the outer hole is Ø50.8mm.
      The outer hole is the exact size to let the lens fit, but with a little bit of friction. Had to carve several holes to find the minimal size the lens could fit in.
      The step is just large enough to have enough surface for the glue to keep the lens in place, I didn't want to reduce the aperture too much.
      I used an X-Carve for carving and Easel for modelling.
       
      With all 3 sides ready, I could assemble the frame. It appeared that my 30° angle cuts were not very precise, but after some sandpapering the sides started fitting together alright. Glued the parts together and left them to dry for a day. To apply some pressure on the joints, I wound several twine loops around the frame really tight, made sure all sides fitted well together and left it to dry like that for a day.

      Part 4: Mirrors
      When selecting mirrors I was looking for the smallest mirror that fit the cone of light. Small mirrors are a lot easier to place, and they let me better control the length of the light path. I considered using elliptic mirrors, but they were bulky and really hard to place. All mirrors are first surface mirrors, otherwise planning their locations would be a lot more confusing.
      This was my original plan of placing the mirrors:

      As you can see, all the angles and distances were carefully measured, and I wanted to simply make mirror holders of those exact dimensions. This was clearly a bad idea.
      I 3d-printed some parts like this:

      And only later I realized that the frame angles are not exactly 60°, and that there are drops of glue along the edges that don’t let me fit the pieces deep enough in the joint between the sides.
      I cut angles from all the mirror holders:

      After I put the first mirror in place I realized the angles are all wrong, and that I needed to re-do the holder. Separating the mirror from the holder was a huge pain, which resulted in an accident. The mirror fell off the desk and got damaged.

      Luckily, only the back side got damaged, the front side was still working:

      The final designs of mirror holders looks like this:

      The holes in the front surface let me apply pressure on the back of the mirror if I ever want to separate it from the holder. The recesses collect the excess glue to avoid mirror skewing when gluing them.
      All other holes are simply to save the filament.
       
      Part 5: Placing mirrors
      What I learned is that you can’t plan positions of several pieces with high precision and just hope that it all comes together. I needed a feedback about the precision of mirror positions.
      I used a laser pointer to verify mirror positions at each step.
      In the picture you can see that the laser is firmly set in a hole in another piece of wood, with layers of isolation tape on the tip of the laser pointer to make it stable. A clamp holds the piece of wood in place, ensuring that the laser ray goes in the same direction as a solar ray would. A crosshair of black thread at the center of the lens ensures the laser goes exactly through the center of the lens.


      When placing each mirror, I marked the spot where I expected the laser to end up. While gluing the mirror holder to the frame, I kept the laser as close to that spot as possible. If for some reason, the laser couldn’t hit the expected spot, I did my best with placing the mirror, and recalculated locations of the following mirrors.
      I saw the first sunspots after placing all the mirrors and simply holding an eyepiece in hand.

      Part 6: Eyepiece holder
      I tried eyepieces of different focal length and liked the picture I got with a 10mm eyepiece the most.
      An eyepiece needs to be in a very exact spot to produce a sharp image. At this point it was obvious that my frame doesn’t match the model, and that I didn’t even know what exactly was wrong with the frame. I didn’t want to rely on the model and moved forward with trial-and-error.
      I printed several parts to hold the eyepiece, with different eyepiece locations:

      The part in the photo was a total disaster. It needed quite a lot of filament, at the same didn’t have enough surface area to be glued to the frame, and not enough surface area to hold the eyepiece firmly.
      The next iteration was a lot better:

      This part has a lot more surface area, and needs less filament to be printed. I intentionally printed the hole for the eyepiece too small, and had to sandpaper it a little bit, to make the eyepiece stay firmly fixed.
      Adjusting the focus is done by sliding the eyepiece up and down until the Sun becomes a circle with well defined borders.
       
      Part 7: Dust
      All optical parts should be kept clean. Dust on the mirrors and the lens will make the image darker. Dust on the eyepiece will show up as artifacts on the projected image. Unlike sunspots, the artifacts will not move with the Sun. To clean the eyepiece I used compressed air. To clean the mirrors I used isopropyl alcohol.
       
      Part 8: Fire safety
      Don’t leave devices with magnifying lenses lying around. Once the Sun happened to be in such a spot that its light went right through the lens, burning through the cap of the eyepiece. Luckily, nobody was hurt and no other damage was done.

      Part 9: Future work
      Build quality of the base is very poor. The frame tilts sideways when adjusting its altitude despite all my efforts. I’d like to build a new base, but leave all the work to the machines. I already have a model for an X-Carve to make both base parts, compatible with my current frame:

      A notch along the edge of the half-circle should eliminate the tilt. The precision of the machining should make the base very stable. Maybe next year, when sunspots become a common daily sight, I’ll get to this project.
       
      Thank you for reading this far!
      I hope you enjoyed it.
    • By Dan20
      I'm trying to buy a 10" or 12" dobsonian and I found this website https://www.telescope.com/ 
      Turns out they have free shipping and can ship anywhere.
      Can I trust this website?
       
    • By ThomasLondon
      Hi,
      I currently have a Lunt 50THa and I am looking for something showing more detail and contrast on the sun's surface. I have been considering the new Meade SolarMax III 70 Double Stack, the Lunt 60 with DS (fairly expensive in comparison) and now stumbled across the Daystar Chromosphere. My key considerations:
      - I love that I can just take out the Lunt at lunch time, put it on a photographic tripod, and I am up and running in about 5min. 
      - When travelling, it would be easier to have one telescope to take with me for day and night use
      - Cost is certainly an aspect - I do not want to spend more than about 3000 pounds.
      May I get your input on a couple of assumptions I am making (and which may be completely wrong - sorry, I am not a telescope expert, I just love using them...)
      - The only purpose of double stacking is to get a narrower bandwidth using (cheaper) filters with a wider bandwidth - by using two 0.7nm filters tuned to slightly different bandwidth the Lunt and the Coronado achieve 0.5nm effective transmission.
      - A Daystar Chromosphere with a transmission of <= 0.5nm will hence show me the same detail as a Lunt or Coronado Double Stack with a single Etalon
      - A refractor up to 80mm does not require an additional ERF
      - A relatively cheap achromat will do - as I am only observing at a single wavelength, the correction for multiple wavelengths really does not make a difference (at least for H alpha)
      So on that background I guess an 80mm refractor with the DayStar will give me a really good solution  am I right?
      Best
      Thomas
    • By Kronos831
      Hello stargazers! I am a 14.5 year old boy currently exploring the hobby of astronomy!
      My first Telescope is the Celestron Firstscope!
      This post is going to contain mostly everything i do from now on!
      i will  occasionally post some tips  and tricks as well as some  images(rarely)
      I am soon getting a 8" dob , but that doesnt mean i wont be using the Celestron firstscope.
      Hopefully, one day i can look back to this and remember the beggining of my journey as i am intrested in studying astrophysics/ astronomy in university . And if not, i will continue exploring this hobby.
      So Lets start!
      Astro Journal #0
      So this is almost everything i ve done so far, i have had the telescope for almost 3 weeks now and have used it quite oftenly.
      The first time i used it was  in relatively okay skies,i had no idea what focusing was and just looked at unfocused stars for that day.I cant believe i had such ignorance! After i tried finding why the stars were like that, i finally unsterstood the purpose of the focuser! The next day i used it on the cresent Moon, it took me 10 minutes to find with the 20MM eyepiece supplied with the telescope XD. ( even though it was righ infront of me)
      It was quite nice! I was able to see some craters on it and focusing was pretty good. Then i turned to the 4mm eyepiece.(75x) mag
      it almost covered the entire fov. For some reason the 4mm eyepiece isnt able to focus very well in general. And it was kind of blurry , but still enjoyable!
      Here are some pictures i took with it:
       

      i continued viewing the moon for a couple
      of days, then i decided to do some nebula viewing.
      I was despirately trying to find orion,as the orion nebula was and Is my FAVOURITE Nebula, it took me some time to realise that what i thought was pegasus was actually orion 's belt and sword  ?‍♂️. 
      The night i first observed orion was a full moon night. It took me around 3 minutes to find the orion nebula in the scope. I just happened to notice it because of accidental adverted vision.
      I ve heard of adverted vision , but hadnt had the chance to use it , until then. I had reasonably high expectations for a 3" reflector, and wasnt sure if i was looking at it or not. It looked like a faint colourless fuzzy blob.
      After reporting what i saw to the forum they assured me that i had indeed saw the orion nebula.( this all from quite light polluted skies!)
      Even though i had high expectations i was pretty satisfied with my views.
      3 days after, the moon wasnt very visible so i  went out to observe. What i saw amazed me. It was considerably brigher than before ,using adverted vision.
      The idea of looking at the nebula itself in combination with the even better view, astounded me.(in the same skies)
      I loved it!!!!!!!!!!! After some though i was very suprised that such a cheap instrument(got it for 60euros , but you can usually get it for around 50) can show you that much!
      Yesterday i woke up to see the moon venus and jupiter( I wasnt  able to view the jupiter-venus conjuction  because of clouds, same with the Super Blood Moon.  Guess i gotta wait another 19 years ?). I was able to find venus before i left for school. it was okay with the 20mm eyepiece. I just didnt have the time to view it in the 4mm( i know the timing was very unfortunate , didnt want to miss the buss)
       
      Astro Journal #1
      So here we are! Today!
      I used the telescope in my backyard(they skies are okay! i can make out around 50 stars in my fov (around 180 degrees)
      I took a view of the orion nebula! You know what they say! You ll never see less than you saw yesterday!(except if the seeing conditions are worse ?)
      I was able to see quite more using adverted vision than the first time!
      { For those who dont know, adverted vision is when you dont look  directly at the object you are observing ,as the areas in your eyes that focus on something arent as light sensitive as the areas who do not.  So this way you achieve better brightness and clarity }
      Then i took a look at Taurus! i noticed some stars and then headed right for The Pleiades!
      The Pleiades , filled the entire Fov of my telescope . It had a pretty clear view. I did not however notice any colour or blue tint surrounding the stars.
      I wasnt expecting much to begin with so that was okay!
      I took some pictures of the Orion nebula! 
      This pictures indicate what you will see with bad seeing full moon  some light pollution and no adverted vision.
       

      However, the results with clear skies, adverted vision and no moon will be WAY better , i Promise. Dark skies will help you the  most when looking at Deep Sky Objects 
      Also FOR BETTER VIEWS Dont forget to DARK ADDAPT: DARK ADDAPTATION ALLOWS THE EYE TO SEE MUCH FAINTER LIGHT . TO ACHIEVE DARK ADDAPTATION TRY AND SPENDING AROUND 30-40 MINUTES IN DARKNESS ( AND NO CLOSING YOUR EYES FOR 40 MINUTES WONT WORK) And be careful. Even a look at your cell phone will take the dark addaptation effect away. So if you want to see somehow, use red flash torches,as red is the lowest wavelenght in power. 
       
      The views you will get on the orion nebula will be amazing! 
      Guranteed!
       

       
       
       
    • By BATUHAN DERELI
      Hello ,
      I am physics student in Turkey . I have used telescopes but they were manual mount because  of that  I do not have any experiences with GO TO  mounts . I upload photos  and I pressed alignment button before finding 3 or 2 stars .  Still  ı did not  find any stars from  catalog  . I really watched many  videos but I did not do it well  my  process  still not  continue . 12 photos  I upload , first  photo teleskop , last photo is the  my  last step ,  which button should  I have press? 












×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.