Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

David Crane

Target catalogue for deep sky imaging

Recommended Posts

DSO browser is a good call as you can sort by so many things to really pinpoint what is good for you in terms of location, size, constellation etc. If you want a book though, then I love these Uranometria offerings https://www.firstlightoptics.com/books/uranometria-20000-deep-sky-atlas-all-sky-edition-book.html and https://www.firstlightoptics.com/books/uranometria-20000-deep-sky-field-guide-book.html and if you like pretty pictures and want to get an idea of what is around and when then this one is a good book too https://www.firstlightoptics.com/books/the-100-best-astrophotography-targets-book.html

Hope that helps :) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

+1 on The 100 Best Targets book.  I have that too and it is excellent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, RogerTheDodger said:

Not a book, but have you looked at https://dso-browser.com/

That is exactly what I have been looking for, and the fact it integrates with APT is cool. Thanks for the link.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Or you could try Stellarium Astronomical Calculations tool - shows targets by class, brightness etc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Jkulin said:

That is exactly what I have been looking for, and the fact it integrates with APT is cool. Thanks for the link.

Glad to be of help :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Being old school I'm rather partial to Keppel and Sanner, though the volumes are primarily for visual and the photos are film. However, if you want to escape the 'best hundred' on the grounds of originality then these volumes are good. Plus they are just nice. Works of passion!

http://www.willbell.com/handbook/nitesky.htm

Olly

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, ollypenrice said:

Being old school I'm rather partial to Keppel and Sanner, though the volumes are primarily for visual and the photos are film. However, if you want to escape the 'best hundred' on the grounds of originality then these volumes are good. Plus they are just nice. Works of passion!

http://www.willbell.com/handbook/nitesky.htm

Olly

*groan* My bookcase really can't hold any more astro books....... Why oh why did you mention these Olly? :) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, swag72 said:

*groan* My bookcase really can't hold any more astro books....... Why oh why did you mention these Olly? :) 

Because you need them, my sweet one!

:evil4:lly xx

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 21/09/2017 at 20:31, ollypenrice said:

Because you need them, my sweet one!

:evil4:lly xx

I do and they are on my Christmas list now :) 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Ryan Adams
      Hi there,
      I am relatively new to astronomy, as well as this forum so I'm sorry if anything seems obvious that I don't pick up on. However after using a very basic set up to capture some photos of the moon I wanted to invest in some astrophotography equipment.
      Ideally I am looking to spend around £800 - £900, and I wanted some ideas on good mounts as well as scopes that can be used to take decent images of the moon along with other celestial bodies in the solar system. 
      I have been looking at the Celestron Nexstar 6SE as well as the sky watcher explorer/evostar series attached to a EQ-5 Pro GOTO Mount but as I said I am relatively new to the hobby and have no idea what's good and what's bad. 
      I would also prefer it if the mount is suitable for deep sky astrophotography along with planetary imaging as once I get the hang of planetary imaging I would like to take a stab at deep sky astrophotography.
      Any help would be greatly appreciated.
      Ryan
    • By Phillips6549
      With several clear nights over the past week,  I've been playing with the Synscan Pro app (Android) in conjunction with a Synscan WiFi adapter on an EQ3Pro mount.  I have to say I'm generally quite impressed.  Much cheaper than buying a traditional handset.  
      However,  this evening I was trying to "creep up" on the Andromeda Galaxy by star hopping towards it via Mirach,  Mu Andromedae and Nu Andromedae.  Mirach was no problem but the other stars were not available for selection in the app.  Am I missing something?  I couldn't find any way to enter an SAO number or any other catalogue number to find the minor stars.  
      Is this a limitation of the app?  Or the adapter perhaps?  Or is it me? 
      Clear skies, 
      Mark. 
    • By eshy76
      Hi everyone,
      The North America and Pelican nebulae are situated in the Cygnus constellation and are thought to be 1800 light years away. My favourite part of the image is "The Wall", which is the "Mexico" part of the North America nebula and is a source of intense star formation.
      The data for this image was collected all on one night and therefore could do with more integration, but I like the result. I've used my go-to "natural blend" narrowband (as originally suggested by Jon Rista on Cloudy Nights):
      R = 76%*Ha + 24%*SII
      G = OIII
      B = 85%*OIII + 15%*Ha
      I personally prefer this "natural blend" to the Hubble palette both in terms of look and ease of processing!

      4 hours integration time, captured with WO Z73/ZWO ASI1600MM Pro/Astrodon Filters. Full details here.
      Thanks for looking!


    • By napaman
      Hi all. 
      Firstly thank you to all contributors. I have found this forum a very useful resource over the last 12 or so months. 
      The excellent advice has led to me accelerating my observing and finding objects easily. I also Live in South Africa and am very spoilt with choice. 
      The problem is I am unsure on the best way to catalogue my observations so that I dont hunt them again. The common messier object etc are easy to catalogue but when it comes to the NGC it becomes difficult. 
      Any advice will appreciated. 
       
       
       
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.