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breckland_astro

Haw Wood Farm (East Suffolk) Star Party Oct 17

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If any of you are interested in a star party in East Suffolk, we have been hosting a Star Party every March and October at Hinton, near Saxmundham, Suffolk at a newly developed Caravan and campsite, Haw Wood Farm, for the last 5 years. It is £12 per pitch per night with electricity hook up (adapter needed) call Dan or Georgina (see link below). Some of you here may know about it; on good nights we have had a SQM reading of 21.75 - it can get dark enough to see the Zodiacal Light! Many local society members meet up: Norwich, Castle Point, North Essex, OASI (Orwell), DASH (local) and Breckland among others and it is generally friendly and welcoming (if we can see you in the dark!). Saturday 14th we run an event: a skytour or talks in the cafe, dependent on weather. Unfortunately, timing clashes with the SGL star party but we're a long way from it.

See link for details: http://www.hawwoodfarm.co.uk/things-to-do/events-hawwood/

Edited by breckland_astro
adding details.
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Thanks for the post, I might attend for the weekend, not too far away and a chance to meet some budding astronomers.

I'll have to dig out the tent and sleeping bag :) 

Nige.

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Ive been going a few years now and very much looking forward to it. A great site and fantastic skies. Fully recommended. 

Edited by Phil Fargaze

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Booked up for my first time at this event. I've heard good reports from colleagues who have attended in the past and am looking forward to it.

 

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