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Hi! This is from last night. Taken at Taurus Hill Observatory, Finland. Florence is still quite bright but relative speed to background stars has slowed down alot as the asteroid moves away from Earth. Perioid seems to be approx. 2,4 hours. In the second image I stacked 1 hour of 60s sub-exposures to show movement of the asteroid.

3122-florence.jpg

3122-florence-2.jpg

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