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Hi - it used to be the case that astrophotographers using DSLRs generally preferred Canon technology to Nikon because of the lower noise Canon sensors. However benchmark tests with organisations like DSomark.com seem to favour many Nikon cameras over Canon and in some of the tests I've seen certainly some of the full frame Nikons appear to deliver images with a lot less noise.

If we are focussed on recovering detail in the shadows in post production, much the same as "daylight" photographers, then is Nikon now leading Canon or are there other factors to take into account.

Thanks in anticipation of your help.

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I think this is true for most of the Nikon cameras although the Canon 80D is also effectively ISO less too so can pull the same data out of an underexposed dark bit with post processing as you would have got with the correct settings when shooting.

I am biased though and think all Canons win on AF performance both for stills and video, have better free software available, better wifi performance and can be used with old M42 type lenses but otherwise there is not much to choose realy.

Alan

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My input is from a very inexperienced user.

I have had a Nikon D5100 on long loan from a cousin for a couple of years now.  Whenever I have tried to use it for prime focus work with either a Dobsonian, Mak or APO because the camera does not recognise the telescope as a Nikon lens it will not allow me to use certain features on the camera, the most important of which is the infra-red remote.  I always have to press the shutter button manually which makes for faster shutter speeds and thus higher ISO ratings than I would like but still with inevitable vibration.  More experienced photographers than me have probably found a way around this but a pal with an older Canon has no such problems.

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Thanks - it's useful to know there are other usability issues. I'm a longtime Canon user so I'm biased as well but the technical data is quite compelling on the lower noise and sharpness of Nikon images over Canon.

iscit also the case that more of the third party software is for Canon and there is less support for Nikon?

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On ‎9‎/‎7‎/‎2017 at 19:06, Relpet said:

My input is from a very inexperienced user.

I have had a Nikon D5100 on long loan from a cousin for a couple of years now.  Whenever I have tried to use it for prime focus work with either a Dobsonian, Mak or APO because the camera does not recognise the telescope as a Nikon lens it will not allow me to use certain features on the camera, the most important of which is the infra-red remote.  I always have to press the shutter button manually which makes for faster shutter speeds and thus higher ISO ratings than I would like but still with inevitable vibration.  More experienced photographers than me have probably found a way around this but a pal with an older Canon has no such problems.

It may be due to how old, or the particular model Nikon you have, but my D3400 allows me to use the ML-3 infrared remote when I don't have a recognized lens on the body (such as prime-focus shooting). Are you shooting in manual?

I wish the sensor on the camera body was located somewhere it could "see" from either front or back of the camera. It's located on the grip, and I have to reach around with the remote almost between the tube (SCT)  and the camera to trip the shutter with the remote. At least I don't have to touch the camera.

One other thing I wish was different with the remote release is, it only allows one shot at a time, and no sequential release. Got sort of dicey shooting the last seconds before totality, and at 3C, trying to get Bailey's Beads and a Diamond Ring, while pushing the remote repeatedly and shuffling the solar filter on and off.

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This pops up so often....

It is like asking a craftsman if he prefers a Makita or a Dewalt, it all depends on the quality of the bits he attaches to the tool and the skill of the craftsman being able to get the most out of it.

 

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6 hours ago, Luna-tic said:

It may be due to how old, or the particular model Nikon you have, but my D3400 allows me to use the ML-3 infrared remote when I don't have a recognized lens on the body (such as prime-focus shooting). Are you shooting in manual?

I wish the sensor on the camera body was located somewhere it could "see" from either front or back of the camera. It's located on the grip, and I have to reach around with the remote almost between the tube (SCT)  and the camera to trip the shutter with the remote. At least I don't have to touch the camera.

One other thing I wish was different with the remote release is, it only allows one shot at a time, and no sequential release. Got sort of dicey shooting the last seconds before totality, and at 3C, trying to get Bailey's Beads and a Diamond Ring, while pushing the remote repeatedly and shuffling the solar filter on and off.

Yes, I have to shoot in manual as none of the auto features will work unless a Nikon lens is attached, as far as I have been able to discover anyway.  That's an interesting point about the sensor, though.  I may have been pointing the remote in a vague direction rather than a specific direction before so I'll get up close and personal next time.

There are astro-modified Canons coming on to the second-hand market all the time in UK so that may be the best way for me to go rather than spend more time trying - and probably failing - to get a result from the Nikon.  I'm also intrigued by the Revolution Imager (made in California, I believe) advertised in this month's Sky at Night magazine.  This seems to tick so many boxes for a novice, feedback on that would be really valuable.  Subject for a new topic maybe.

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On 9/8/2017 at 00:06, Relpet said:

My input is from a very inexperienced user.

I have had a Nikon D5100 on long loan from a cousin for a couple of years now.  Whenever I have tried to use it for prime focus work with either a Dobsonian, Mak or APO because the camera does not recognise the telescope as a Nikon lens it will not allow me to use certain features on the camera, the most important of which is the infra-red remote.  I always have to press the shutter button manually which makes for faster shutter speeds and thus higher ISO ratings than I would like but still with inevitable vibration.  More experienced photographers than me have probably found a way around this but a pal with an older Canon has no such problems.

Vibration is easily cured.

An intervalometer, cheap on ebay will allow hands free, if not it must have a 10sec self timer on board.

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As Mike has said most cameras have an inbuilt timer that gives a 10 second delay and some allow up to 10 shots (up to the max 30s exp) which is quite handy for wide field static shots, failing that or if shooting bulb mode you can just cover the lens/scope for a couple of seconds at the start and end of the exposure when pressing the button. The real fix though is a cheap intervalometer.

Alan

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Depends on what canon verses what Nikon, a friend has a full frame Nikon that out perform a 6d..

If you want it modded then canon ones are far easier to find someone to do it..nikon modders are very rare

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3 hours ago, Alien 13 said:

The real fix though is a cheap intervalometer.

Thanks a million to you and Mike for this advice.  Have just checked ebay and found one compatible with the Nikon model at a very affordable price.  SGL members, you win again!

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I chose Canon, ease of use, ease of support, ease of software availably, ease of community support, ease of connectivity (mine I control from android tablet), ease of modification, ease of vintage lens use and never any mention of star eating issues. 

Edited by happy-kat
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2 hours ago, happy-kat said:

I chose Canon, ease of use, ease of support, ease of software availably, ease of community support, ease of connectivity (mine I control from android tablet), ease of modification, ease of vintage lens use and never any mention of star eating issues. 

These are some of the pluses with the Canon, lots of accessories seem a bit cheaper too. They are also happy ruining lens-less (scope or vintage lens) with Man, AV and TV modes as well as video.

Alan

Edited by Alien 13

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Plus there is magic lantern depending on which canon model if that is your thing to.

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8 minutes ago, happy-kat said:

Plus there is magic lantern depending on which canon model if that is your thing to.

I have never been brave enough to try it, lots of good features though :icon_biggrin:

Alan

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Have you two got shares in Canon ?

 

Dave.

 

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25 minutes ago, davew said:

Have you two got shares in Canon ?

 

Dave.

 

Think I should have with the amount of gear I have bought. :icon_biggrin:

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1 hour ago, davew said:

Have you two got shares in Canon ?

 

Dave.

 

Nikon make great cameras but the rest is not good, no decent free software from Nikon and limited third party support make it a bit like the Mac vs a proper computer.

Alan

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Not so. Nikon's free software is so good you don't have to pay a fortune for Lightroom like others do :wink2:

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For Nikon try digiCamControl. It's free, has all the functions, and also has an astronomy module :smile:

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1 hour ago, Mr Spock said:

For Nikon try digiCamControl. It's free, has all the functions, and also has an astronomy module :smile:

More great advice for anyone on a budget.  Many thanks.

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