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Greetings, all. I was fortunate enough to be able to comfortably drive to a location in the path of totality for the Great American Eclipse which happens to be the Cherokee Indian Reservation in North Carolina. The wide-field images were shot using a fully-zoomed 50-300mm lens attached to a Nikon D3200; the tighter images were shot through my 127mm Mak using a Nikon D50. I had to remember to abandon all filters during totality - and, of course - to just look up! Truly, a life-changing event.

 

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2 hours ago, John Baker said:

A much better view than I had in South Devon, possibly with clearer skies. Always an awesome sight to see

Thanks, John. This was my first time experiencing totality. When I actually looked upwards, I was mesmerized and had to fumble with the cameras (one attached to a scope, mind you) to catch that ephemeral moment. The gradual darkness (and sudden darkness at totality) along with the drop in temperature and burgeoning stars was an experience to behold!

~Reggie~

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1 hour ago, johnfosteruk said:

Outstanding images. I love the wide diamond ring shot in particular. 

Thanks, John. The diamond ring has a special place with me, too :icon_biggrin:

Edited by orion25
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21 minutes ago, Scooot said:

That's a wonderful set of images taken on a day you'll never forget. :) 

Thanks, Richard. You are so right; it was an unforgettable experience. The collective sigh at totality was priceless!

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