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At that focal ratio an inexpensive zoom eyepiece like the Seben 8 - 24 would be the most cost effective eyepiece to give you a range of magnifications. Don't be tempted by the cheaper 7 - 21 Seben zoom.    :icon_biggrin:

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I believe there is a sticky post or FAQ here that covers choice of eyepieces.

For a budget long-focus refractor I should think that some inexpensive Plossl eyepieces will be quite adequate.

If you go for the zoom eyepiece you will need a low-power eyepiece, e.g. a 25mm Plossl, in addition. If you read the zoom spec sheet you will see why...

The Seben 8-24mm zoom appears to be the same as the 8-24 branded as Celestron, Sky-watcher, Starguider. There have been some posts here about these recently. 

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18 hours ago, Ricochet said:

How many eyepieces are you thinking of getting and what's your budget per eyepiece? 

I'm pretty new to this. But it was a gift and it came with about 3 pieces I believe including the piece that connects to the telescope(sorry if none of this makes sense). I'm not sure how much these things usually cost but is £40 a good budget?

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You can find out what eyepieces cost easily enough.

The original kit eyepieces were probably the cheapest, so £40 for three Plossls might be a significant upgrade. £40 per eyepiece should get you eyepieces good enough to re-use in other telescopes later.

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Looking at the specs for your scope it would have come with a 20mm, 4mm and 3x Barlow. Of these only the 20mm was really of any use in my opinion. 

If you want to get three eyepieces to replace them then I would suggest something around 9mm for high power, 20mm as a mid power and then 30mm as a finder/low power eyepiece. 

FLO currently have offers on both Celestron and Vixen plossls which are decent eyepieces and better quality than the ones that came with your scope. The eye relief on short focal length plossls is a little bit short so you might want to go for something with a bit more eye relief. BST Starguiders are my usual recommendation but over your stated budget. 

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7 hours ago, Ricochet said:

Looking at the specs for your scope it would have come with a 20mm, 4mm and 3x Barlow. Of these only the 20mm was really of any use in my opinion. 

If you want to get three eyepieces to replace them then I would suggest something around 9mm for high power, 20mm as a mid power and then 30mm as a finder/low power eyepiece. 

FLO currently have offers on both Celestron and Vixen plossls which are decent eyepieces and better quality than the ones that came with your scope. The eye relief on short focal length plossls is a little bit short so you might want to go for something with a bit more eye relief. BST Starguiders are my usual recommendation but over your stated budget. 

Thankyou so much, this has been very helpful

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Here is the manual for your telescope: https://s3.amazonaws.com/celestron-site-support-files/support_files/PowerSeeker_76_21044.pdf

Indeed, it came with a 20 mm and a 4 mm eyepiece, and also a 3x barlow. The 3x barlow 'changes' the 20 mm and 4 mm eyepieces to 6.7 mm and 1.3 mm effectively.


The telescope if f/9. If it is top quality you should be able use eyepieces with it having focal lengths as short as 4.5 mm. Any shorter (4 mm, 1.3 mm) will just give empty magnification: overly magnified dim and blurry images.


A better set-up would be 32mm and 20mm eyepieces with a 2x barlow, the latter 'changing' the eyepieces to 16 mm and 10 mm effectively. All (32, 16, 20 and 10 mm) should be in the comfort zone of the telescope's optics and give you resonantly bright and sharp views.

 

 

 

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