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Okay so Wednesday night I got bored and decided to have a wild stab in the dark (literally) and seeing what I could get under heavy light pollution and a rising almost full moon. Didn't expect to get anything tbh, so I'm quite happy with this.

440 stacked images of 1.6 seconds at 200mm using Nikon D5300 and sigma 70-300 at f4.9, iso 12800. Stacked in DSS and cleaned up in LR and PS. Untracked.

Obviously need more data, but for a first try, I'm chuffed.

LRM_EXPORT_20170812_111230.jpg

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That's impressive all things considered. Super result. 

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Wow never saw andromeda yet and I hope that I will be able to see what you saw thta night!  Very impressive!

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