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assasincz    90

Hi all,

I want to share with you my so far best image of Saturn, taken using:

  • 305/1500 goto dob Skywatcher
  • QHY-5 mono
  • IR-UV block filter
  • Baader barlow 2.25

Registax, stack of 40 images, postprocessing

 

2017-07-21_Saturn.jpg

Edited by assasincz
  • Like 13

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