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As I am hopeless with DIY, give me a car, bike home electrics or plumbing I`m fine anything else I am rubbish. Well bought this ironing chair second hand from Ebay £9.98 came in bubble wrap on inspecting it the back is cracked and broken. For the price I am not bothered about that but could you kind people give me some ideas as to how replace it please.

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45 minutes ago, onlyme said:

you can use para cord to weave (wrap one up one down in a sort of way) between the two back upright arms, would look good and be very comfortable.

My guess this would eventually lead to the two uprights bending inwards making the height function problematic ???? I think the idea of the seat top is to prevent this more so than to act as a back rest. I have always found these ironing stools to encourage more leaning forward than lounging back on. Probably to encourage people to get on with the ironing :D

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good point spacey, but the cord does not have to be so tight as to hit the upper C# note every time you lean against it, just tight enough not to have all your upper body weight propped against the cold metal arms.

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Drill one hole sideways through each bar, about 10cm from the top..  

Get two short metal L brackets and connect one to each upright securing each with a single bolt and locking nut so that one flat side of each bracket runs parallel to the back of the seat and the brackets a flush with the front of each upright.

Cut a piece of wood to make a back rest.  If necessary, glue in small packing pieces of wood to ensure the backrest sits tight against the uprights.

Secure the back of the wooden backrest to the brackets with wood screws.

Simples.

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