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Hello everyone! I'm new here. So my question or questions may sound kinda ignorant. The answers may be a little obvious. I love this site  and have read so many comments and learned so much!

Anyway, I have a Canon 60D camera with live-view. I have a Tasco reflector with D=114mm F=900mm(this maybe a little small?). I will be using a T-ring/adapter and with this I hope to capture many decent photos. But for the eclipse, do need a special filter for the scope or the camera or both? If so, could you give suggestions where to get this? Thanks to everyone for any help!

 

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You need a solar filter for the front of the scope. In general there are 2 available makes - Thousand Oaks and Baader. Both are a heavy filtering film and they fit over the front of the scope.

For visual they are termed something like ND5, for imaging I think they are ND3. The 3 and 5 refer to the power of ten that they attenuate by so one is 10**-3 and the other is 10**-5 (The superscript seems not available here?). So very very heavy filtering.

The visual 5 is likely the better option, simply you can alter the camera to take the difference into allowance and then it does for you to view the sun.

The catch is that EVERYONE wants one and last I read someone could not buy one from anywhere - you are sometuning like 19 days away.

They can be made but again you need the solar film, A4 or letter size is how they are supplied.

Start going through the scope retailer sites and see if anyone has one of the right diameter and if they have them in stock and can get one to you on time.

Just reread the post, the DSLR may not managed to get the sensor and focal plane of the scope to coincide. Unfotunately s DSLR and a scope does not mean it will just work nice and easy, there is a mechanical requirement as well. Have you tried the DSLR out on the scope yet ?

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Thank you for responding so quick!  Thanks for the info.  About the ND, is that Neutral Density? Because I have ND filters I use for many outdoor photo projects(of course, they are only 58mm). Maybe B&H or Adorama has them? About the sensor deal, I've seen some folks mention using an extension to get a better view. But to answer your question, No, I have not tried the camera on the scope. Haven't received the T-ring and adapter yet. But I also am getting the extension with it, just in case. I guess we'll see.

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Hi pixelperfect:

It's definitely possible that other dealers might have them, but make 100% sure it is a solar filter you are using. It should be ND5 (which is useless for anything except the sun) and to properly block the IT and UV wavelengths also.

The most important thing is that be an aperture filter - unfortunately you can still sometimes buy the ones that fit inside the scope like a regular astro filter. Don't be tempted for a second- they regularly crack under the heat, which equals a permanently ruined camera or a permanently ruined eye.

Don't know what others think about the following suggestion, but provided you do not look through the viewfinder at the sun you might be able to get away with a heavy ND5 welding glass as an aperture filter. If you only used the live view that might work, and probably won't damage the camera.

The best option would be to try for the Baader solar film, but in the current climate that might be tricky. If you can source someone else's off cuts though you could scrounge enough for a 58mm filter or similar.

Billy.

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I agree with above, you definitely need a filter for all moments in the eclipse until the full eclipse when the whole sun is covered by the moon, that's the only time your photos will be better without a filter.... before and after that moment you're risking to frying your sensor without a filter.

 

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