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impactcrater

The Surprisingly Unknown

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According to NASA the length of a Saturnian Day is unknown...who would have thought ?

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The length of a day on Saturn has recently been deduced. Oddly, it was a mystery for an inordinate period compared to other planets <drum-roll, please>:

"Astronomers now agree on an average day of 10 hours, 32 minutes and 35 seconds." - Universe Today - by Fraser Cain

Here's the article:

https://www.universetoday.com/15418/interesting-facts-about-saturn/


And how about the article as a Pdf?

Ten Interesting Facts About Saturn.pdf

Have fun!

Dave

Edited by Dave In Vermont
sp.
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"Unknown" - ?  I suppose it depends on one's precise definition of how much unknown ! I thought surely not, it has been about 10h and a bit all the time I have known Saturn ( over 60y!) so I reached for my trusty "Handbook of the Heavens" Bernhard/Bennet/Rice 1957 an lo! 10h14m. That is good enough I'd have thought :) Anyhows, how do you time a bunch of clouds to a few seconds ?!

 

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That's likely why it wasn't until recently that it was accurized at the 10h32m35s mark. Perhaps by bouncing a RADAR through the clouds and off whatever serves as it's solid core?

I smell a Cassini.....

Dave

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Fascinating links, thanks for posting.

So what is meant by rotational period? To me it seems inconceivable that it would rotate as a rigid body, but I can imagine the period varying with both depth and latitude.

Ian

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nice in Oxfordshire....I lived in Maidenhead for  6 months....I assume it is the rotation of the metal hydrogen core . Is that true of the Jupiter ? NASA says it matters to create a weather model . so handy here on Earth!

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5 hours ago, impactcrater said:

nice in Oxfordshire....I lived in Maidenhead for  6 months....I assume it is the rotation of the metal hydrogen core . Is that true of the Jupiter ? NASA says it matters to create a weather model . so handy here on Earth!

Could be a lot worse!

I wondered if it referred to the solid core, but I don't see why the magnetic field should necessarily be locked to it. I guess there's some maths to say it is, but clearly there is some slippage going on otherwise they wouldn't have seen the apparent slowing down. I hope they get a better model than we've got here! Never seems to be right, for astronomy at least :icon_biggrin:.

Ian

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Saturn and Jupiter have roughly the same period of rotation on their axis............making a day on each planet last about 10 hrs............give or take. I guess its easier to measure on Jupiter visually because it has more visible features which when observed can be timed.

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Imagine trying to decide how long an 'Earth Day' is by just tracking clouds - and without any mountains to keep some in the same place...

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2 hours ago, LukeSkywatcher said:

making a day on each planet last about 10 hrs

I wonder if they are entangled ?

 

5 minutes ago, Stub Mandrel said:

Imagine trying to decide how long an 'Earth Day' is by just tracking clouds

I believe I did that earlier also :)  'bunch of ' clouds I think it was :D

I still have not worked out quite why they are excersised about it, not as though you wanted to land in London, not London,Ontario or London,Saturn ??  I mean look at the bother Jupiter's RedSpot gives us when we try to prescribe it in Stellarium  :happy6:

 

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