Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

stargazine_ep34_banner.thumb.jpg.28dd32d9305c7de9b6591e6bf6600b27.jpg

Sign in to follow this  
J.C.Buster

Assertion

Recommended Posts

I have an assertion:

There area planet in our solar system that not have been observed yet. The planet has the same size as earth and has the same orbit around the sun. The reason that it not yet have been observed are because its orbit is a half year after earth and therefore always been covered by the sun.

Is there possible to prove that I’m wrong?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From Astronomycafe:

"There is no way that a counter-Earth would remain exactly behind the Sun while being constantly perturbed by the other planets. Eventually it would end up on a slightly different orbit by a few miles, and the synchrony would vanish. It would slowly slide out from behind the Sun and would have been observed over the millennia as a new planet."

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Planetary orbits are elliptical, not by much, but nevertheless not circular.

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Confirmation just in;

...am informed a widescreen edition of Jerry Anderson's 'Journey to the Far Side of the Sun' has indeed been avertised in print this month :clouds2:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have an assertion:

There area planet in our solar system that not have been observed yet. The planet has the same size as earth and has the same orbit around the sun. The reason that it not yet have been observed are because its orbit is a half year after earth and therefore always been covered by the sun.

Is there possible to prove that I’m wrong?

It's tough to prove a negative.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's highly unlikely that 2 planets would share the same orbit. If there were one sharing Earth's orbit we'd have detected it (or its influence) either directly or indirectly.

If there were a planet (lets call it 'Earth2') sharing the exact same orbit as Earth on the other side there's a chance we'd have probably seen it from Earth because both planets and the Sun wouldn't always be in conjunction ie. in a straight line.

Orbits aren't circular, they're elliptical so when Earth is at aphelion (furthest point from the Sun - about 95 million miles) it would be moving slower than Earth2 (at perihelion) so Earth2 would be seen east of the Sun. Conversely, when Earth is at perihelion (the fastest and closest part of the orbit - distance from the Sun about 91 million miles), Earth2 would be at aphelion and we'd see it to the west of the Sun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This idea has a long pedigree - Pythagoras and his followers believed in a "counter-Earth" which could never be seen. But its presence would reveal itself through gravitational perturbation of other objects in the solar system, so if we want to cling to the idea of its existence then we also need to suppose that it has zero mass (and is therefore held in orbit by supernatural influence). So I think we can consider it disproved - certainly more firmly than unicorns or mermaids, neither of which contravene physics. But hey, it's a nice idea.

Andrew

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If Earth2 was populated by a species called Human2 then we would have heard them by now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i dont think the 3 body system of the sun earth and earth 2 would be stable. the orbit would get perturbed fairly fast and the planet seen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.