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Trollinthewall

A good first scope and sheer frustration

27 posts in this topic

Hello all

Been observing the night sky for several months now through binoculars and looking to take the plunge into getting my first scope (have two weeks holiday from work coming up soon so hoping to get it for then :) ) have been looking at this scope http://m.skyatnightmagazine.com/review/telescopes/sky-watcher-star-discovery-150p-go-reflector

To me it seems like an idea beginners scope and within my price range that I'm willing to spend, from reviews it gives a good view of planets and DSO's which I must admit I have a particular interest in and it seems portable which again is a must for me. As to my sheer frustration my neighbour has just put up a socking great spotlight on his garden wall that lights mine and his gardens up like a football stadium 😠 which makes observing pretty hard at the moment.

Any thoughts from you guys would be appreciated :)

George 

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The best approach is to have a chat to your neighbour, explain about your hobby, perhaps offer to show him / her some views through the scope ?. That way the message about the imact of the spotlight will get home more effectively.

If the "being friendly and reasonable" approach does not bear fruit I think you are entitled to raise the issue with your local authority as a nuisance but do try and discuss things with your neighbour first.

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25 minutes ago, John said:

The best approach is to have a chat to your neighbour, explain about your hobby, perhaps offer to show him / her some views through the scope ?. That way the message about the imact of the spotlight will get home more effectively.

If the "being friendly and reasonable" approach does not bear fruit I think you are entitled to raise the issue with your local authority as a nuisance but do try and discuss things with your neighbour first.

Yeah I'll definitely try have a word with them when I can get hold of them, I'd like to think that they will be reasonable I've got on with them thus far however they do have their moments of being pretty inconsiderate. Haven't got the scope yet just looking at this one I've mentioned but when I do get one I maybe shall try showing them some sights through it to get my point across, sounds like a good way to do it. Obviously want to avoid going down the local authority route if there's any other way

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Hi There,

I had a similar problem with a neighbour who had a spotlight in the apex of her house: the sensor was pointing at her central heating vent - consequently it went on every time a plume of steam rose from the boiler.  I went around and explained about my hobby and she said she would fix it.  It duly went out and so I bought her a box of chocolates as thanks.  She accepted them but later confessed that the bulb had actually just burned out. The sensor is now fixed.

If you get no joy and are still reluctant to take it to the Council, You could also consider a shade. I recall seeing a post where someone put a piece of opaque fabric between two long battens - strategically positioned, it blocked the direct light shining on his viewing spot.  A thick blanket hanging from a washing line could also work.

Good Luck.

John

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Posted (edited)

I too have a neighbour who has an outside light that they leave on all night (why!!, whats the point??). Anyway my girlfriend got me two wooden broom handles and some black out fabric. The idea is to stitch the black out fabric between the broom handles then connect this between two of my concrete fence posts so it blocks out the light (well in my direct line of vision).

Although I must say for the last couple of times i have been out the light has not been on (touch wood)

Edited by Chefgage

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My steplad decided we should have an IP security camera with two powerful IR beams aimed straight at my usual scope location. Fortunately I have access to the on/off switch :laugh:

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7 hours ago, Chefgage said:

I too have a neighbour who has an outside light that they leave on all night (why!!, whats the point??). Anyway my girlfriend got me two wooden broom handles and some black out fabric. The idea is to stitch the black out fabric between the broom handles then connect this between two of my concrete fence posts so it blocks out the light (well in my direct line of vision).

Although I must say for the last couple of times i have been out the light has not been on (touch wood)

That's exactly what mine does, comes on at about 8pm and it stays on till the following morning I don't see the point in it at all and it's not one of the LED bulbs either where the lights a bit more directed it's one of the old style Street lamp bulbs that lights up everywhere.

A thick blanket may work John will just have to scoot my washing line over. Thanks for the help guys on that.

 

Still debating about my choice of first scope I like the look of the one I've posted but I'm no expert yet, would it be a good scope for a beginner like myself? 

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That will be okay for a first scope. I might be worth setting out what you would like to achieve.  Occasional use for observing or would you like to have a go at imaging. Also will you need to be able to take the setup to other remote sites.

It might be worth joining a local astronomy group and have look at some setups and see what other say.

 

 

 

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I must admit I have a jigawatt security light in my back garden but I was clever and it's not wired to a sensor I discovered a new invention a plug and a off on switch so it's only used to see where I'm walking to the shed or late night barbecues.It backfired though because my new neighbor saw it and put one on his flat and one on his new pride and joy shed and there on sensors drat!

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Posted (edited)

This thread makes me very glad I live way out in the woods with no neighbors and no such lights. Since we are off the grid the idea of wasting power on exterior lighting is not a consideration. When I go out before my wife retires she draws all the curtains and watches TV in the dark. Astronomy wasn't a consideration when we set up here, but it has worked out stunningly. Now if I could just figure oit how to get around our humid hot summer nights.

R

Edited by theropod
Typo correction
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On ‎03‎/‎07‎/‎2017 at 22:35, westmarch said:

Hi There,

I had a similar problem with a neighbour who had a spotlight in the apex of her house: the sensor was pointing at her central heating vent - consequently it went on every time a plume of steam rose from the boiler.  I went around and explained about my hobby and she said she would fix it.  It duly went out and so I bought her a box of chocolates as thanks.  She accepted them but later confessed that the bulb had actually just burned out. The sensor is now fixed.

If you get no joy and are still reluctant to take it to the Council, You could also consider a shade. I recall seeing a post where someone put a piece of opaque fabric between two long battens - strategically positioned, it blocked the direct light shining on his viewing spot.  A thick blanket hanging from a washing line could also work.

Good Luck.

John

Like this? :D

post-46661-0-73470700-1445086013.jpg

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There's a guaranteed cure for light pollution:

predator-ol-painless-gif.gif?w=650

 

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Posted (edited)

14 hours ago, rockystar said:

Like this? :D

post-46661-0-73470700-1445086013.jpg

Neighbour facing mirror of this size would work even better :D

Would get a message throug clearly if angled to their bedroom window. 

Edited by Erla

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2 hours ago, Erla said:

Neighbour facing mirror of this size would work even better :D

Would get a message throug clearly if angled to their bedroom window. 

you haven't seen what it says on the other side ;)

to be fair, It's only the kitchen light, not an outside security light, that I have to contend with

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Posted (edited)

Some years ago, my neighbour had a permanent light installed (security reasons) at the terrace of his restaurant. After midnight, it was almost the only light source around, and rather disturbing, when I was observing DSO's. As a friendly guy, he allowed me to have a keyswitch installed, with access from the terrace. Cost me about 180€ (the price of a mid-class eyepiece), but was a once-for-all solution. When having everything prepared for observing, I walk over to the terrace (about 25m), observing eye covered, and switch off the light;  just 2 minutes needed.

I got the idea from a stargazing friend with an obsy, who had made a successful arrangement with his community to switch off two streetlights.

A 6" f/5 is a very capable scope, and will give you years of pleasure.

Do you really need a goto system? I'd put the money into a 8" f/6 Dob (Skywatcher Starliner often mentioned here), and, at any rate, add a RDF/Telrad/Rigel, combined with a 8x50 RACI finder. A fool proof combo, no need for batteries, no hassle - and it's fun, chasing celestial objects!

Hope this helps

Stephan

DSC_0588.JPG

(The fin is a Deep Sky diver's fin, of course....)

Edited by Nyctimene
Picture added
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Perhaps a large mirror to reflect the light merrily through his bedroom-window...

A proverbial 'dose of his own medicine.'

"Fire-In-the Hole!"

Dave :evil1:

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4 hours ago, Nyctimene said:

(The fin is a Deep Sky diver's fin, of course....)

Big keys or small feet?

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Posted (edited)

13 hours ago, Stub Mandrel said:

Big keys or small feet?

Neither big keys, nor small feet.

The fin just indicates the size of scope I'm using this night; in the case above, my little 80/400 frac.

When I'm hauling out the 18" Obsession, the fin looks that way:

DSC_0589.JPG

(At second look, you'll notice, that it's a split fin, which means double star observing. You can imagine, what can be seen, when I'm using the 14x100 binoculars.....)

Have fun!

Stephan

Edited by Nyctimene
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2 hours ago, Nyctimene said:

Neither big keys, nor small feet.

The fin just indicates the size of scope I'm using this night; in the case above, my little 80/400 frac.

When I'm hauling out the 18" Obsession, the fin looks that way:

DSC_0589.JPG

(At second look, you'll notice, that it's a split fin, which means double star observing. You can imagine, what can be seen, when I'm using the 14x100 binoculars.....)

Have fun!

Stephan

ROFLMAO! :laugh:

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For me I use a big(ish) 8" dobsonian from the back garden and an ST80 to be mobile.

I'd still class myself as a beginner and the dob I have has been really good to pull around searching for stuff with a telrad. Also get a decent phone/tablet app and you're learn stuff so quickly. Whilst it's not an ideal portable solution I've had it out to other sites a few times (tube across back seat and base (mount) in the passengers footwell!).

I'd definitely recommend buying second hand to keep costs/risk low (you may decide not to continue).

At the same time the much smaller ST80 has been really cool in terms of mobility and a great partner in crime to my dob!

good luck, cheers Dave

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On 7/7/2017 at 21:01, rockystar said:

Like this? :D

post-46661-0-73470700-1445086013.jpg

Haha glad to know I'm not the only one with this problem :D

Yeah I did consider the 8inch dob but as I can't drive due to a medical condition portability is an issue I have a lovely dark farm just down the road from me where the farmer let's astronomers use his land to observe on which is easy walking distance to me so not sure about the size of the dob for portability or storage space, and no go to is not an essential just thought it'd be a nice addition :)

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When these security light threads start, there are the usual sensible solutions suggested, and accompanied of course by
the not so sensible ones.

There is the element of humour in the daft ones of course, but before anymore crazy ones are submitted, please be aware that
if anymore illegal remedies are inserted, it will run the risk of spoiling it for the OP, whom I'm sure is more concerned with
a solution that will bring him a successful result :happy11:.

 

 

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Posted (edited)

In fairness to all these neighbours I very much doubt that few would be vindictive enough to buy a security light with the express purpose of ruining someone else's hobby.  I can well imagine that they either don't know about your hobby, or even if they do and just as likely, don't realise how their light makes things awkward for you.  I think in all cases a little communication would solve a lot, possibly make a new friend and introduce someone else to the interest of the night sky.  As it is the world seems full of folks that won't say 'boo' to a goose let alone a neighbour that they've never spoken to.  What is the world coming to?  We all seem to think the place is full of axe murderers!  I suspect our great-grandparents would proverbially 'turn in their graves' as I am sure in their day you knew most of your neighbours for streets around. 

Access to their security light switch is a great idea - even if you offer to finance it, maybe even a blue tooth controller?

Edited by JOC
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Neighbours are an over-rated accessory. I find that life goes along very sweetly without them...

Olly

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i have a very nice neighbour that decided to put up dancing LED fairy lights in a tree / along a fence so 'the garden looks nice'

 

one nice conversation, and these have now been moved to the other fence and out of my view.

 

to the OP, just be friendly and nice. I loved the idea of showing them what you are doing / looking at. Most people are decent and will try to help if they can.

 

I say...most.

 

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