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Astrokev

Astrokev's ROR - The Build

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smudgeball    164
2 hours ago, Astrokev said:

so fingers crossed.

I was so happy when the guy I work aside lent me his.

15 bags of concrete by hand, no thanks.

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Astrokev    64

Tell me about it! 

I hand mixed 30 bags of ballast + 6 cement for the footings :sad: - spread over several weekends mind!  All over now though - hooray! :icon_biggrin:

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Astrokev    64

After removing the shuttering from the last foundation block, today saw me start on the pier. First came digging the hole.

I decided on a 750 x 750 x 750mm hole for the pier block. This was harder than I expected. After the heavy rain recently, the ground was soft enough, but it was difficult to wield the spade once the hole got below about a foot deep! Ended up using a garden trowel to scoop up the last bits of soil into a bucket. I was also getting close to the water table, so it was really sticky down there. Glad to finish it!

Here's a few pics of today's progress.

I now need to figure out how to hold my air-con tubing in place, and at the correct height, before filling with concrete. What have other folks done to achieve this?

I'll probably use some rebar (when I find out where to get some from) hammered into the ground to try and create more anchorage for the block. Not sure if this is necessary, but I reckon better safe than sorry.

 

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Bizibilder    4,208

I didn't bother with rebar for my pier block but I did "hollow out" a couple of inches deep all round the base of the hole to that the bottom of the block was "anchored".  i have no idea if this was a good idea!!!! :)   However my pier is solid enough after about eight years in the ground.

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wimvb    1,747

I don't think that rebar into the ground will help much, adthe it's too easy to bend tohelp with anchoring. But definitely use it inside the block & pier. Any diy store that sells concrete will also sell rebar rods in different sizes.

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smudgeball    164

Have you not got this finished yet ?

I didn't use any rebar in mine but I'm not going for a concrete pier.

I think as Wim mentioned, definately in the pier itself. My block was smaller than yours so it was just concrete without reinforecement.

I've just constructed my 7' x 5' peg base ready to take delivery of obsy end of September.

Neil

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Astrokev    64
On ‎13‎/‎08‎/‎2017 at 17:34, smudgeball said:

Have you not got this finished yet ?

I didn't use any rebar in mine but I'm not going for a concrete pier.

I think as Wim mentioned, definately in the pier itself. My block was smaller than yours so it was just concrete without reinforecement.

I've just constructed my 7' x 5' peg base ready to take delivery of obsy end of September.

Neil

I'm afraid I tend to over-engineer most things DIY, so plan to use rebar in the block as well as the pier. Being at work during the week really drags out the progress :sad:.

I've found it surprisingly difficult to find a store that sells rebar - Wickes and B&Q don't seem to stock it. I think the local Travis Perkins may have some, so off there on Saturday. Also need to order delivery of endless bags of ballast and cement - too many to carry in the car without using up a tank full of diesel!

Also need to find a concrete mixer. Local hire shop may be the answer if I can't 'phone a friend'. Looking forward to the next stage. It'll be hard graft, but the end result will be the first bit of my build that will be visible when the whole thing is finished!

Kev

Edited by Astrokev

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wimvb    1,747

Usually it's frost and water level that causes movement in the ground and shift of the block and pier. I would aim for getting the block deeper than frost will get during the winter months, and have the immediate surroundings filled with draining gravel, rather than sand or clay. A local builder should be able to give you advice on the best way to make the block and pier. It's better to over-engineer a pier than to 'under-engineer' it, but over-engineering will most likely also mean over-budget.

 

Good luck with the build

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Adam J    410
On 15/08/2017 at 22:32, wimvb said:

Usually it's frost and water level that causes movement in the ground and shift of the block and pier. I would aim for getting the block deeper than frost will get during the winter months, and have the immediate surroundings filled with draining gravel, rather than sand or clay. A local builder should be able to give you advice on the best way to make the block and pier. It's better to over-engineer a pier than to 'under-engineer' it, but over-engineering will most likely also mean over-budget.

 

Good luck with the build

In the UK the frost will be unlikely to get deeper than 10cm ever mate. Rain / water course is a different matter. 

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wimvb    1,747
1 hour ago, Adam J said:

In the UK the frost will be unlikely to get deeper than 10cm ever mate. Rain / water course is a different matter. 

You folks in the tropics. :grin:

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Astrokev    64
5 hours ago, Adam J said:

In the UK the frost will be unlikely to get deeper than 10cm ever mate. Rain / water course is a different matter. 

Indeed. Frost isn't really a major risk.

I live quite close to a river so, although the garden doesn't flood, the water table is probably quite high. I'm not sure there's much I can do about this. I don't want to move, and re-routing the river is probably outside my budget ;-)

I've taken on-board the various comments and think hammering rebar into the ground in the hole before filling with concrete should be effective at reducing the risk of the pier moving if I accidently bump into it in the dark (in addition to putting rebar in the pier, as suggested).

The image I have in my mind is like a radial root system of a small tree or bush. Having had to dig-up several of these over the years reminds me how solidly the trunk is held in place by only 4 or 5 main roots radiating out into the surrounding soil.

Kev

Edited by Astrokev

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Astrokev    64

Haven't posted a picture in a while, so here's a screen grab of my SketchUp design (minus cladding of course). Hopefully the finished build will look pretty close to this :icon_biggrin:

My SketchUp model has all the main elements of the build on 13 different layers, with everything dimensioned. This has proved really useful so far in serving as the blue-prints to take all my measurements from.

 

5.jpg

4.jpg

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2.jpg

1.jpg

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smudgeball    164
19 hours ago, Astrokev said:

should be effective at reducing the risk of the pier moving if I accidently bump into it in the dark

If I accidentally bump into my pier bolted on top of all of that concrete, and it moves......I'm going on a diet !

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