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The noctilucent cloud is in the upper right of the image, hovering over some beautiful pink and purple-tinged lower level clouds just after sunset during last year's autumnal equinox. A single 1/1250s exposure at f/5, 155mm, shot with a Nikon D50. No processing. One of the most beautiful sunsets I have ever seen!

large.5977e583d4afa_CLOUDS-SUNSET9-25-16.JPG.b34616170a29d6e3148a05eebb24128f.JPG

Reggie

Edited by orion25
better image
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4 hours ago, Zakalwe said:

I think that that is an ordinary cirrus cloud uplit by the setting sun. Or maybe an iridescent cloud http://www.atoptics.co.uk/droplets/irid1.htm

NLCs are really only seen after the sun has set.

Thanks, Zakalwe. It's a tricky subject!

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You'll know them once you see them. They really are a very unique sight and can't be mistaken for anything else.

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Darn, this photo was taken outside of the start and end dates. Noctilucent or not, it doesn't qualify *sigh*:hmh:

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its a winner in my view Reggie, lets hope its let to run ,in the history of the cosmos whats a few months eh. well done. charl.

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9 hours ago, xtreemchaos said:

its a winner in my view Reggie, lets hope its let to run ,in the history of the cosmos whats a few months eh. well done. charl.

Thanks Charl :icescream:

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