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Hi all. Sharing my capture of Jupiter from 19 April 2017. The video comprises frames from 1622UT to 1718UT and shows the GRS traversing the planet.
Video can be viewed at either the youtube or attachment link below.

https://youtu.be/8M7d3m34c5I

2017-04-19-1622_1-RGB_pipp_x264.mp4

Equipment used: Celestron C8, QHY5L-II-C, GSOx2.5barlow

Edited by joachimong
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