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dave1978

The large hadron collider?

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that might work, but you could put a box on the scales, then set the scales to zero, add your helium, and the weight would decrease. the scales would then show the weight of helium in the box.

I think this would work?

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I don't think a delay of few more months will be so bad. After all, the Hubble needed a service mission before it could send back clear images, but it certainly was worth the wait! :smiley:

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I don't think a delay of few more months will be so bad. After all, the Hubble needed a service mission before it could send back clear images, but it certainly was worth the wait! :smiley:

A little more time to grab some images, before we all zoom down a black hole. :bino2:

Jeff.

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that might work, but you could put a box on the scales, then set the scales to zero, add your helium, and the weight would decrease. the scales would then show the weight of helium in the box.

I think this would work?

It is a thought.

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Oh dear! It gets worse for the LHC - it's now out of action until Spring 2009!!! :)

According to Judy Jackson at Fermilab (near Chicago), the meltdown was 'expected'. But Michael Harrison (also associated with Fermilab) says "..there are systems that are supposed to prevent it from melting and dumping helium. So it was obviously something else that went on as well."

Anyone hear/read any details regarding the 'something else' which Harrison's referring to?

article link

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From a report I heard on the BBC Radio 4, they were due to shut down for winter servicing soon anyway, they didn't expect to do any science before next spring anyway. we will have to wait and see.

Archie

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Anyone hear/read any details regarding the 'something else' which Harrison's referring to?

Heavy artillery vomiting forth shells and shot, round and grape? :)

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We used to blame the bomb for the bad weather (when I was a lad).

Now can we blame the collider? :scratch: Nah - it just doesn't sound right.

Can we make helium now or is that a global resource like fossil fuels?

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From: http://uk.news.yahoo.com/18/20081117/tsc-atom-smasher-restart-delayed-further-c2ff8aa.html

Europe's giant atom-smasher, which broke down only days after being switched on with great fanfare, is not expected to restart before the middle of next year, the operators said Monday.

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a multi-billion dollar machine designed to shed light on the "Big Bang" which scientists say gave birth to the universe, is still being worked on, a spokesman for the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) said.

No start-up was planned before the end of May, James Gillies told AFP, adding that an assessment would be made when CERN's governing council meets on December 12.

Hitherto CERN officials had indicated that the LHC could be operational again by the end of April 2009.

The LHC took nearly 20 years to complete and cost six billion Swiss francs (3.76 billion euros, 5.46 billion dollars) to build in a tunnel complex under the Franco-Swiss border.

It was switched on amid much excitement on September 10, but was shut down again on September 19 after a large helium leak.

"The time necessary for the investigation and repairs precludes a restart before CERN's obligatory winter maintenance period, bringing the date for restart of the accelerator complex to early spring 2009," CERN said at the time in a statement.

But Gillies said the maintenance period would last until the end of May.

"There is still a lot of work to do and we want to be sure that everything is in order before starting up," he said. "We will start up the LHC again as soon as possible."

The LHC is a 27-kilometre (16.9-mile) circular tunnel in which parallel beams of protons accelerate close to the speed of light.

It aims to resolve some of the greatest questions surrounding fundamental matter, such as how particles acquire mass and how they were forged some 13.7 billion years ago.

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Thanks for the update, Chris. :p The weather has taught us Amateurs that we have no choice except to be patient... waiting a few months for repairs will be a piece of cake. :hello2:

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