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gnomus

M97 - Owl Nebula in Bicolour (HOO)

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I lost astro dark a couple of weeks back.  I thought, therefore, that I would try capturing narrowband during nautical darkness on the basis that I may as well do something with all the gear.  I ended up with 6 hours of Ha and 6 Hours of OIII captured at my home observatory using my Esprit 120 and QSI 690 atop a Mesu 200 mount. Filters are Astrodon and exposures were 30 minutes each. Processing in PixInsight and Adobe Photoshop.

I cropped the image slightly to eliminate a couple of brighter stars at the edge of the frame.  I'd be interested to hear what people think.

A_M97_HOO_FIN_CROPx1920.thumb.jpg.ba09aab82f4d51803597dc2e813f95d5.jpg

Edited by gnomus
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You've certainly captured the outer halo perfectly!!! Nowt wrong with that :) I do wonder if the middle could stand a little more contrast to bring the owl eyes out a little more...... This is a very technically accomplished image, but probably one of THE most boring things to look at in my opinion!!! :) 

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7 minutes ago, swag72 said:

You've certainly captured the outer halo perfectly!!! Nowt wrong with that :) I do wonder if the middle could stand a little more contrast to bring the owl eyes out a little more...... This is a very technically accomplished image, but probably one of THE most boring things to look at in my opinion!!! :) 

Thanks Sara.  I went back and forth on the middle portion contrast.   There is certainly more that could be done, but  ended up where I ended up.  

I cannot agree about the object though.  I find these planetary nebulae fascinating.  

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1 minute ago, gnomus said:

I cannot agree about the object though.  I find these planetary nebulae fascinating.  

How boring it would be if we all liked the same things!!!

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2 minutes ago, Stub Mandrel said:

I think it's a hoot!

'The Owls are not what they seem'. (How's that for topical?)

Edited by gnomus

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29 minutes ago, swag72 said:

How boring it would be if we all liked the same things!!!

Do you think the object is something only 'a-twit-would-do'?  

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1 minute ago, gnomus said:

Do you think the object is something only 'a-twit-would-do'?  

I dunno... but your Avatar could do with a Hedwig

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1 hour ago, gnomus said:

Do you think the object is something only 'a-twit-would-do'?  

Now that caused a splutter!!! :D  :D 

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I like this one and although the description can cause confusion to some, this really does look like a 'planet' with the centre treatment that you have given it. I do like the outer halo too.

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2 hours ago, swag72 said:

... I do wonder if the middle could stand a little more contrast to bring the owl eyes out a little more...... 

Perhaps you are right.  How is this?  As well as boosting core contrast, I've cropped it a bit tighter so that a little more detail is available at 'forum size'.

C_M97_HOO_FIN_FIN_CROPx1920.thumb.jpg.2bc97cd02ee3cf345a7713189d0ecc80.jpg

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9 minutes ago, steppenwolf said:

I like this one and although the description can cause confusion to some, this really does look like a 'planet' with the centre treatment that you have given it. I do like the outer halo too.

Thanks Steve.  I was pleased to get it too.  All down to those clever chaps at Astrodon of course.  :wink2:

 

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Yes Steve I prefer the second edit :) It looks a little more punchy and less flat now :)

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The 'problem' is that it's one of those subjects that looses some of its distinctive look if you can pull out the fine detail.

 

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I like it Steve - As Sara says a little more contract 'could' help but great image, technically a very interesting object but struggle to find it pleasing from a prettiness point of view.  Still, great to see well presented like this.

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2 minutes ago, swag72 said:

Yes Steve I prefer the second edit :) It looks a little more punchy and less flat now :)

 

1 minute ago, Stub Mandrel said:

The 'problem' is that it's one of those subjects that looses some of its distinctive look if you can pull out the fine detail.

 

AAAAAAARRRGHHHHH :icon_biggrin:  

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30 minutes ago, gnomus said:

AAAAAAARRRGHHHHH :icon_biggrin:  

Sad but true, my rather grim attempt is nonetheless more 'owl like' :-P

5929861e09ed6_owl.thumb.png.d47b99dbc796e1567e2b0e6db423bf14.png

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29 minutes ago, Stub Mandrel said:

Sad but true, my rather grim attempt is nonetheless more 'owl like' :-P

 

Well you have certainly not made the mistake of showing too much fine detail in the core...  :icon_biggrin:

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1 hour ago, gnomus said:

Well you have certainly not made the mistake of showing too much fine detail in the core...  :icon_biggrin:

ROFL!

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Well done Steve on the Owl, especially the outer halo and the detail within the central regions.

Fine punning humour displayed by everyone too :happy1:.

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great image Steve and superb humer 

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That's a great image. I think you have done a great job. Love the detail in there.

 

Thanks for the puns too. Very funny ;)

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