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It's difficult to get a sense of scale in this astronomy game; but we try.  So here are 8 pics of the ISS passing between Vega and Epsilon Lyra last night - which is a second's worth of my Canon 7D firing off as fast as it can.  The background is a single 30 second tracked exposure for a bit of context.  Details: Esprit 100 prime focus/Canon 7D:1/1000s ISO1600  +30s background.  The trick if you want to try this is to use planetarium software to find out exactly when the ISS will be near a bright object, then pre-align and focus on or near that object,  then wait for the ISS to appear in the finder before letting the shutter go in rapid mode.  I also optimised pre-focus on the computer using the focus feature on Nebulosity before switching the camera back to stand alone mode.

ISSvega_elyrae_web.jpg

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On 12/06/2017 at 16:14, CraigT82 said:

Very nice!  Interesting alternative to one of the more 'normal' ISS captures (I say normal but still damn difficult!)

Thanks.  Bit nerve-wracking setting up for it.  You don't get a second go!

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