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Hello everybody,

I curious to know whether it is worth buying a cheap Newtonian OTA? I want to get started with deep sky photography and it seems like the cheapest way in. I'd rather spend the money on a decent mount/tripod, with the thought I could replace in the future once I have a bit of experience under my belt

I am looking at this - https://www.bintel.com.au/product/bintel-bt200-f4-imaging-ota/

It is branded Bintel so I assume it is a rebranded Chinese model

Thanks!

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Actually looks like its Taiwanese  manufactured equipment from a company called GSO.

Its available in Europe (at least I think this is the same) for 425 euros. 

http://www.astroshop.eu/gso-telescope-n-200-800-imaging-newton-ota/p,47062#tab_bar_2_select

Sadly no customer reviews on that site, though it looks like it works out cheaper than the European source, but I'm converting to GBP and the pound exchange rates are misleading...everything looks pricey over here these days.

I would wait and see if any others on SGL have any experience of Bintel/GSO.

Steve

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Hi

I've had one -a very similar f3.9 model- for a few months now. They need a few simple modifications as listed here, but compared with the dim refractors usually recommended for beginners, they produce great results in far less time, with good colour balance and pinpoint stars. Be warned however: you're gonna need a heavy mount and a coma corrector which will add considerably to the cost of getting you sky-worthy. HTH.

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9 minutes ago, alacant said:

Hi

I've had one -a very similar f3.9 model- for a few months now. They need a few simple modifications as listed here, but compared with the dim refractors usually recommended for beginners, they produce great results in far less time, with good colour balance and pinpoint stars. Be warned however: you're gonna need a heavy mount and a coma corrector which will add considerably to the cost of getting you sky-worthy. HTH.

Looks like you have been here before Alacant :-)

I am thinking of a HEQ5 which I assume should be fine for this.

Going to dig through that thread now ...

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20 minutes ago, Zac Scott said:

thinking of a HEQ5

Not sure of it's capacity, but with the proper dovetails and a dslr you're gonna be over 10Kg. I use an eq6 and it's more that happy. HTH.

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3 minutes ago, alacant said:

Not sure of it's capacity, but with the proper dovetails and a dslr you're gonna be over 10Kg. I use an eq6 and it's more that happy. HTH.

Mmm okay, looks like I have some re-thinking to do

EQ6 is probably the way since it will most likely take whatever I want in the future

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