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Very nice Victor. Good luck as you build up your site.

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Just now, laudropb said:

Very nice Victor. Good luck as you build up your site.

Thank you very much!!

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The layout is excellent indeed. Very tidy.

Hopefully you will add observation reports as Your website develops.

I`Ve bookmarked it, and intend to keep an eye on it.

 I got the same book btw :).

Amazingly well done so far! :thumbsup:

Rune

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Just now, Pondus said:

The layout is excellent indeed. Very tidy.

Hopefully you will add observation reports as Your website develops.

I`Ve bookmarked it, and intend to keep an eye on it.

 I got the same book btw :).

Amazingly well done so far! :thumbsup:

Rune

Thank you very much! very nice words! And yes I will add observation (when the weather allows me to observe!)

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Do keep writing. It was quite interesting to read. I think you are a bright young man. Bump up this thread when you write up your experiences on the blog, it will be interesting to find out how things develop for you.

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Just now, Erla said:

Do keep writing. It was quite interesting to read. I think you are a bright young man. Bump up this thread when you write up your experiences on the blog, it will be interesting to find out how things develop for you.

Thank you very much! I get so happy reading these comments!

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very well done.interesting site.some sound advice.good luck with all you wish for.:thumbsup:

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You most certainly deserves lots of feedback for Your work and effort from an astronomyforum like this.

I think everybody in here are more than happy to see youngsters like you take such an interest in Astronomy,

and never underestimate Your already great contribution to this forum either.

 

Rune

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great wee site!! very crisp and professional looking but still has a relaxed fell to it! well done and couldn't agree more about starting a blog and sticking up observing reports.

p.s I must say I am quiet jealous of your kit!!

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50 minutes ago, Grumpy Martian said:

Language a bit iffy on the twitter posts.

I will change that :-)

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