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Nebula Filters


Caz
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I haven't heard much spoken about them on the site, so heres a question, do you only use them for astrophotography, or can they be used for visual observing to. Arthur suggested a HA filter, but I've just looked up the price of these things, and nearly passed out due to lack of oxygen to the brain.... :shock: Are they really that much, or am I howling at the wrong moon..... :lol: Any advice on this matter, as always would be greatly appreciated... :(

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£85 upwards for 1.25"? Yup, I'm afraid so. Considering the improvement in views though they are actually worth theire cost over and over I think. However, if you promise not to tell anybody about this (and you are only after visual filters) try this man:

http://stores.ebay.co.uk/BJOMEJAG-EBUYER-STORE_Astronomical-FIlters_W0QQcolZ4QQdirZQ2d1QQftidZ2QQtZkm

He sells the filters and the mountings also. Keep it to yourself though :lol:

Arthur

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If you were going to buy filters to help out with nebulae, which ones would they be, in order of importance, please? I have a hard time paying more for a filter than I have for a graphite shafted driver, but I'd like to add one or three to the collection.

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If you were going to buy filters to help out with nebulae, which ones would they be, in order of importance, please? I have a hard time paying more for a filter than I have for a graphite shafted driver, but I'd like to add one or three to the collection.

Narrowband Neb first, then OIII, Ha last....checkout Moonfish or SCSAstro for good prices on all three.

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Thats good to hear Caz, with Saturn i think it helps getting the Cassini division in poor seeing personally and Mars shows better details from my experiance with the Filter(Mines with royal mail at the moment lol) getting the 2" soon though.

James

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Been trying to gen up on this and the astrophotography narrow pass HA filters and their ilk really are what they say they are i.e. they don't let much light through, just the hydrogen band. The exposure time is greatly increased so presumably some of the useful light is also blocked out. Is it likely that something like a proper HA filter would render fainter nebulae all but invisible to the eye?

Martin

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But the Hydrogen light IS the useful light - at least for the filter. It's doing exactly as intended.

However, from Ambermiles comments on a previous question I asked, there are 2 sorts. One for CCD's and one for visuals. I assume that the visual filter is not as narrow as the CCD.

And yes, the exposure time would increase.

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