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Earl

What was the star type that our solar system was born from its ashes?

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If we work out the elements that our solar sytem is made from can we work out what type of star it was that provided the ingredients for it?

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at a Guess, a white giant, going by the metals we have on earth, but who knows might of been made a magrathea " hitchhikers guide to the galaxy :icon_biggrin:" charl.

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My limited knowledge would tell me that a Supernova would have been the source of the heavy elements we see, this could be a red giant or a binary system that included a white dwarf. It would be interesting to find out.

Alan

Edited by Alien 13
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2 hours ago, Alien 13 said:

My limited knowledge would tell me that a Supernova would have been the source of the heavy elements we see, this could be a red giant or a binary system that included a white dwarf. It would be interesting to find out

Yes, that's how I understand it too. As for red giant and white dwarf, that would be be a stage of a star's life. A large star on the main sequence would turn into a red giant before (possibly? inevitably?)  going supernova or a white dwarf could go supernova if it absorbed enough matter from its binary twin which was ejecting matter in the process of dying. If it is the second type of supernova, it still would've been a more massive star than its twin in order for it to finish its nuclear reactions first. 

I'm only writing this so you (Alan) or anyone else can tell me if I've got it right or wrong. Thanks to @beerme for recommending https://openstax.org/details/astronomy . There's a thread on this book but alas I don't know how to link to it.

 

 
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Our solar system might have condensed from matter from several stars of different types. 

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Our system will have condensed out of a cloud along with other stars, we were originally part of an open cluster like Pleiades. A near by supernove will have at some time before that made a bang and supplied the assortment of heavy elements into that cloud, maybe more then one.

It may have been the same or another that caused the cloud to start condensing into "lumps" of gas and dust from which the sun and other stars formed. But we are not the product of "a" star.

Leaves the question of which are the other stars of which we were originally in a cluster with - have heard that it may have been those that form the plough. Worth considering since as we have the right combination for life then there may be a slightly higher chance that they have also. I could be looking through my Megrez 90 at Megrez while an inhabitant of Megrez is looking at Sol through his Sol 90.

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An excellent question!

I think this will be grounds for many of us to look to find an answer to.

Thank you!

Dave

Edited by Dave In Vermont
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I think the answer is "Yes"? :D

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metallicity

Can't find better link right now... But recall that the SUN
is estimated to be a "3rd generation Star"? "Metallicity"
inferred? Clearly stars from past generations I & II were
relatively poorer in "metals" (Elements beyond H/He)? :)

I assume they were Blue Giants (things usually are... ) :p

Edited by Macavity
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Enclosed below is the 'Periodic Table of the Elements.' As the number of the element advanced - so would the gravity and mass and age of their creator - a star. Created through the process of nuclear-fusion within their core. When that star goes nova, these elements are propelled out into space. When they find a gravity-field, they will be drawn into a disk of other elements & matter. Then come together until the gravity ignites into another star - such as our Sun.

It's a roll of the dice which elements will be the most abundant, or how high up the periodic-table the new star begins with. But all elements out in the reaches of space will be present. In varying amounts.

Dave

 

cs_periodic_table_of_elements.jpg.5d1b5cfb682f3d6e3b6126d4941b5f87.jpg

"We are truly 'stardust.'"

 

Edited by Dave In Vermont

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