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ISS taken with my 10" dob, asi 120 mcs camera and x 2 barlow. Followed the ISS with the finder scope across the sky whilst recording the AVI. This is a single frame brightened up. 

iss1.png

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smaller picture deleted. I'm used to uploading images to facebook so I always enlarge to the biggest I can to get around the quality loss.

 

Edited by john86
smaller picture deleted
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Wow !!....  you cannot be that far off imaging a space walking astronaut.

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Well Done John. Not an easy capture, but you did good here,
I'm impressed.        
I tried to make an Improvement but not very successfully I'm afraid
Your smaller version looks great.

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Fantastic image!

What settings did you have your asi camera at ?

What did you focus on?

Regards,

Simon

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Pure luck, originally I was out capturing single close up frames of moon craters looked around and seen the ISS on its way over I tured down the exposure a bit  and guessed the focus pretty much bang on. Since then I have been out and purposely tried to capture it again and failed on the focus or brightness. It's a real difficult thing to capture right for me. Overall 900 frames 40 odd with the iss and only 6 worth posting. I still have the 40 odd frames with the iss at different angles as it passed. Forgot to add the frame I posted has been cropped too.

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can you remember your resolution or frame rate?

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I might get still have the setting file in the folder I'll have a look when I get home 

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hello mate, I don't have the log just the file that PIPP put all the frames in. I do know it was captured in 480x480 then cropped again by PIPP. histogram levels at RED 73, GREEN 86, BLUE 91. say it was around 50 fps. ill attach some originals that haven't had any tweeking done.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by john86
deleted extra images

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