Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

  • Announcements

    sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_rgb.jpg.9467c4d39b22ba8239e1b5ad252fcee2.jpg

Guy Wells

Near-Earth asteroid 2014 JO25

Recommended Posts

Guy Wells    222

Potentially Hazardous Asteroid 2014 JO25

We observed this large Near Earth asteroid again last night, when it was very bright at +11.6 mag. It was crossing our field of view in about 20 minutes, so we imaged it moving through three different star fields in less than an hour!

The lightcurve that we obtained from our images covers about one fifth of a full rotation. 2014 JO25's lightcurve shows the typical features of an elongated object, as it brightens and fades over the course of a rotation. The shape and rotation period were first seen in radar images taken at Arecibo observatory a few days ago.

Our lightcurve of 2014 JO25 is currently the only one in the database.
The lightcurve database: http://alcdef.org

_2014_JO25_001C_c_d_233_DBE_DBE.png

2014 Jo25.png

Jo25 LC.png

JO25-3.gif

  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Stu    15,888

Fantastic work Guy, really interesting stuff. Love the video.

I guess it depends how you see things as to whether you can describe mag 11.6 as really bright! ;)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guy Wells    222

It is likely to be the brightest object that we deal with this year. The majority of our work is fainter than 18th magnitude. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Davey-T    9,700

Excellent information Guy, makes my timelapse look amateurish, I'm surprised there aren't more images around considering all the publicity and clearish skies.

Dave

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Uplooker    1,376

Guy,

Brilliant work and captures, the video particularly.

I would have loved to have even viewed, never mind imaged this object. Unfortunately clouds had other ideas.

very well done again.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
John    18,696

Excellent report and work Guy :icon_biggrin:

I was pleased to glimpse this one myself for a short while.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Phil Fargaze    253

I managed to capture the asteroid on Wednesday eve. Here is a short edit showing it`s real time movement. Taken with a Watec 120N+  video camera through a C9.25.

I believe the two stars it is passing is TYC 3025-01044-1 and TYC 3025-00866-1.

https://youtu.be/L64lbe09OBE

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Davey-T    9,700
12 minutes ago, Phil Fargaze said:

I managed to capture the asteroid on Wednesday eve. Here is a short edit showing it`s real time movement. Taken with a Watec 120N+  video camera through a C9.25.

I believe the two stars it is passing is TYC 3025-01044-1 and TYC 3025-00866-1.

https://youtu.be/L64lbe09OBE

Nicely captured Phil.

Dave

PS: Are you going to Hersty this year ? I see they're offering a discount for early booking by the end of this month.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Phil Fargaze    253

I don't think I'll be going herstmonceax this year. Yes I did notice the early booking discount.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guy Wells    222

Potentially Hazardous Asteroid 2014 JO25

We follow this remarkable Near Earth asteroid as it is moving away from Earth and fading. It will soon be too far south to be seen from Z48 and Z80, but last night it was still visible and as bright as +13.4 mag.

2014 JO25.gif

2014 JO25.png

Edited by Guy Wells
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guy Wells    222

Farewell 2014 JO25.

+1 mag fainter.
Low declination.

JO25.png

Edited by Guy Wells
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guy Wells    222

Half a magnitude fainter last night. That is the last time that we shall observe this PHA. The next 'close' pass is 12-04-2020, at 0.16AU. It won't be observable from our location again, at least while I am still here!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×