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stepping beyond

1st attempt with the Spc900nc

4 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

I haven't had too many chances to get out this year due to the clouds and wildfires burning in western N. Carolina. I've been working at trying to get some data processed and I must have forgot how to process Jupiter . I was using pipp , AS2 and reg.6 and having a really hard go at it. I guess time will tell the tale if I totally forgot how to rgb align and balance but , it's a start for the year. Enjoy and have a Happy Easter.

Jupiter 4-14-17{1}.jpg

Edited by stepping beyond
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Nice, RGB align in R5.1.

hope you didn't mind !

 

58f37a256029c_Jupiter4-14-171.jpg.png

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33 minutes ago, stepping beyond said:

I haven't had too many chances to get out this year due to the clouds and wildfires burning in western N. Carolina. I've been working at trying to get some data processed and I must have forgot how to process Jupiter . I was using pipp , AS2 and reg.6 and having a really hard go at it. I guess time will tell the tale if I totally forgot how to rgb align and balance but , it's a start for the year. Enjoy and have a Happy Easter.

Jupiter 4-14-17{1}.jpg

In registax ,in the wavelets pane right hand side you will see RGB align box ,clicky button, hey presto

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Posted (edited)

Thanks Knobby, I welcome the tips. I've also got some Jupiter data using the asi174MM cooled that I've still got to tackle and fearing the stacking and combining of my rgb,  I'm still trying different things to get the hang of using mono after using color cams and I'm going to like the detail once I get my mojo back and some decent weather. Mono will take me alot longer to adjust to than my color ccd cams.

Edited by stepping beyond

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