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I found my second galaxy


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Tonight I found my second galaxy (obviously Andromeda first)  and I'm well pleased. I spent an hour scanning the skies for it and new i was in the right area but it just wouldn't pop out for me, but then i thought i spotted something, a few gentle taps on my scope to see if i was seeing things or there was actually something there, and there was ? the faint smudge of NGC2903 was in my sights.i could see absolutely nothing but a smudge but it was definitely there. Another great feeling of finding something new with your scope and just taking the time to scan the sky is amazing and feels so rewarding. Ngc2903 ☑️

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Congratulations! It's always a buzz to see the first one, and recognise it for what it is :icon_biggrin: In the same field of view as Andromeda (depending on what scope and eyepiece you use) you should also be able to see a second, fainter galaxy core too. That one is M32. Also have a look for the Whirlpool Galaxy in Ursa Major. It's quite high in the sky at this time of year, and is reasonably easy to find. There you will see two galaxies, one absorbing the other

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Congrats from me too. Would definitely agree that M51 (the Whirlpool) is a great target; it's easy to find (near the end of the "handle" of the plough) and fairly bright for a galaxy. M81 and M82 (also in Ursa Major) should also be high on the list. I always find them slightly harder to find, but again they are quite bright and easy to see.

Billy.

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Well done !

M51 is a good target because you get it's nearby companion NGC 5195 a the same time.

You you can get M31 at low power then M32 is right next door and the fainter oval of M110 is on the other side of M32, possibly in the same field of it's a really low power, wide one.

Edited by John
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Excellent! :biggrin:

If you haven't already done so, try hunting for some DSO's next. M42, the Orion Nebula, is very easy to find as it surrounds the middle star of Orion's sword. M13, the great cluster in Hercules, looks like a small ball of lots of stars. It actually comprises of around 300,000 stars and is 145 light years in diameter!

The Leo Triplet is next on my list as I've never seen it, and now I've had a drink and nibbles I'm off out again to hunt for that. And M13 again too as I've only seen it once

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I found the Leo triplet, well I could only see 2 of them for some reason and both in the same field of view, does that sound about right? I was going to try and find M81 but it was to high up for me to make it comfortable so I'll go back to that, I feel I need to go back to the Leo triplet again also and find the 3rd one. 

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7 hours ago, Gary170782 said:

I found the Leo triplet, well I could only see 2 of them for some reason and both in the same field of view, does that sound about right? I was going to try and find M81 but it was to high up for me to make it comfortable so I'll go back to that, I feel I need to go back to the Leo triplet again also and find the 3rd one. 

that third one is tricky. It took me at a dark site. (NELM about 5.6 - I estimated the other night) and an experienced observer to describe it for me.

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The 3rd triplet (NGC 3628) is harder to spot, a narrow cigar / splinter shaped galaxy. I managed to see all 3 with my ED120 refractor but last night was not too "transparent" here so I needed to use more careful scrutiny to pick up the 3rd member of the group.

I'm looking forward to observing Markarian's Chain again soon with my 12" dob - I can get 10+ galaxies in the same field there and thats quite a sight on a dark night :icon_biggrin:

Edited by John
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29 minutes ago, John said:

The 3rd triplet (NGC 3628) is harder to spot, a narrow cigar / splinter shaped galaxy. I managed to see all 3 with my ED120 refractor but last night was not too "transparent" here so I needed to use more careful scrutiny to pick up the 3rd member of the group.

I'm looking forward to observing Markarian's Chain again soon with my 12" dob - I can get 10+ galaxies in the same field there and thats quite a sight on a dark night :icon_biggrin:

Oh I've got to have a look for that, sounds amazing. 

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Good work Gary.

I was trying to observe my 2nd galaxy last night to but the wind was really causing me problems. I also started with Andromeda and since then have been wanting to find more galaxies but have struggled. last night I was looking for the Leo triplet and M64, but the scope was wobbling around to much to get a good look.

Glad one of us had a good find though ;) 

Tom

 

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Same here had nice clear sky's last nite and went hunting th whirlpool galaxy spent well over an hour scope' n about just right of th last  star in th ploughs handle but no joy was using a 32mm plossl wud ths be th right EP to use for ths galaxy 

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26 minutes ago, REG78 said:

Same here had nice clear sky's last nite and went hunting th whirlpool galaxy spent well over an hour scope' n about just right of th last  star in th ploughs handle but no joy was using a 32mm plossl wud ths be th right EP to use for ths galaxy 

I was using my 30mm vixen npl and my scope is a dob200p, i found it with my lowest and then moved up in mag, still only a blur when a had it in my sights thou. Not sure what scope you are using so can't comment why you didn't see it

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Its sw 130 had no prob finding andromeda th other month use th binos first thn onto my scope just cudnt locate th whirlpool galaxy lastnite hopefully clear sky's again tonight hav another crack at it 

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Lowest power is the way to find it. M51 will benefit from a little more magnification once you have it in view. Two dim and hazy spots of light right next to each other, one larger than the other, is what to look for. Rather like two dim eyes looking back at you from space !

 

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