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JOC

How much kit does a novice need?

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JOC    1,308

Damn these cloudy nights for ruining my bank balance.  I think I'm starting to get to a point where I've got most of what I need - what do you think (apart from cloud free nights), anything else I should have on my radar?  I've still got a solar filter in my sights, just missed one that I think would have done in the classifieds.  I'm tempted by an observatory, but I don't think I can justify the cash until I know how much I'm into all this.

Skywatcher Skyliner 200P (8") FlexTube GOTO 1200mm F/L (F6); Alt-Azimuth Mount; SynScan AZ Computerised Handset.   Dual-Fit 1.25"/2" Crayford Focuser.     

Supplied eyepieces (1.25"): 10mm & 26mm Plossls;

Celestron Omni Plossl 1.25" 32mm;

Meade Super Plossl 15mm; 

TV 11mm Plossl; 

TV 8mm Plossl;  

Adequate x2 Barlow

Available filters: Skywatcher 2-plane polariser, Skywatcher UHC, Skywatcher Light Pollution; Optics O-III;

Astrozap Dew shield. 

Power tank and leads and alternative mains adapters

Dew band

Canon T3 Rebel (1100D)

Cheshire collimator and laser collimator

Edited by JOC

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Stu    14,808

I would definitely call a halt for a while until you know more about what you like and how strong you think your interest will be.

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nightfisher    6,512

Yes, stick with what you have for time being, we all end up with to much kit

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John    17,529

You seem to have all the bases covered. More stuff is going to be about small enhancements rather than major steps, unless you decide to get seriously into solar observing / imaging.

 

 

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Astro Imp    2,731

Whilst I agree you have more than enough to get you well into this hobby I found the one thing that increased my enjoyment was finding something to sit comfortably at the eyepiece. This doesn't have to be anything fancy, just something that makes you comfy.

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JOC    1,308

Astro Imp, that's a good point.  I have bought a couple of plastic bar stools (so they will withstand the damp).  However, although they have some degree of up and down movement I find that there are only some elevations that I can sit on them for.  What I think would be useful is a chair with about 3 ft. of up/down movement.  I don't know if they make such a thing, but I bet they would cost a pretty penny - I got the two bar stools for a tenner each and to a point they don't do a bad job.

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SilverAstro    2,090
11 minutes ago, JOC said:

would be useful is a chair with about 3 ft. of up/down movement.  I don't know if they make such a thing

not sure about 3ft but something like these ? :-

https://stargazerslounge.com/topic/92462-diy-folding-observing-chair-w-plans/

http://davetrott.com/inventions/the-denver-observing-chair/

and lots more like them Google "observing chair" or  "diy observing chair"

 

Edited by SilverAstro
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JOC    1,308

SilverAstro, Oooo.....aren't they neat?!  I didn't even think that such a thing would exist.  My dad's a fair carpenter, I'll print off the plans and ask him if he would build me one of them if I bought the materials.

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jabeoo1    1,170
1 hour ago, Astro Imp said:

Whilst I agree you have more than enough to get you well into this hobby I found the one thing that increased my enjoyment was finding something to sit comfortably at the eyepiece. This doesn't have to be anything fancy, just something that makes you comfy.

Yes totally agree Astro Imp.  This one served me so well*, found secondhand for £15 quid at a charity place near my house. Snapped it up & never looked back or looked forward to updating it.  Its perfect :)

*Very important to not have a muscle burning in your back whilst appreciating an IO transit of Jupiter. 

 

DSCN0888.JPG

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SilverAstro    2,090
2 minutes ago, JOC said:

Oooo.....aren't they neat?! 

My dad's a fair carpenter,

Yep!

Seems like he has a new mission in life :)

I should have said Google in Images for those, - that'll give you a quicky overview of the possibilities.

 

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JOC    1,308

I've done some printing and I've been an surprised dad with his new project, hee, hee, he said he'd look at it for me :-D

Edited by JOC
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domstar    440

I never go observing without my eyepatch. It saves squinting and can also cover your observing eye when you need to check stellarium.

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Putaendo Patrick    1,116

One piece of kit I find is a great compliment to a telescope is a pair of regular 8x40 or 10x50 binoculars - not rubbish but not expensive either, about 50 pounds new gets you some good options.

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Louis D    831

Hi JOC.  I don't know if I've recommended one to you in another thread, but I would never be without a widest field 2" finder eyepiece around the 38mm to 42mm range.  Since you're in the UK, you can pick up a 40mm TS-Optics Paragon ED or a 40mm Explore Scientific 68° Maxvision, depending your budget and ability to handle eyepiece weight.

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Paul M    1,559
On 19/03/2017 at 15:57, JOC said:

Damn these cloudy nights for ruining my bank balance.  I think I'm starting to get to a point where I've got most of what I need - what do you think (apart from cloud free nights), anything else I should have on my radar?  I've still got a solar filter in my sights, just missed one that I think would have done in the classifieds.  I'm tempted by an observatory, but I don't think I can justify the cash until I know how much I'm into all this.

Skywatcher Skyliner 200P (8") FlexTube GOTO 1200mm F/L (F6); Alt-Azimuth Mount; SynScan AZ Computerised Handset.   Dual-Fit 1.25"/2" Crayford Focuser.     

Supplied eyepieces (1.25"): 10mm & 26mm Plossls;

Celestron Omni Plossl 1.25" 32mm;

Meade Super Plossl 15mm; 

TV 11mm Plossl; 

TV 8mm Plossl;  

Adequate x2 Barlow

Available filters: Skywatcher 2-plane polariser, Skywatcher UHC, Skywatcher Light Pollution; Optics O-III;

Astrozap Dew shield. 

Power tank and leads and alternative mains adapters

Dew band

Canon T3 Rebel (1100D)

Cheshire collimator and laser collimator

Steady on!

I'm a beginner too, I began in 1975 and still don't have much more kit than that ! :) 

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Dave In Vermont    4,758

Several versions of this basic design are on the market:

 

Vestil-CPRO-600-2.jpg.45baa6b4e4f12549c53c93eec52a4ff4.jpg

 

One important thing to keep in mind - note the curved leg-ends both front & back? Some don't have this. The result, on damp or wet soil, can be the legs sinking under you, leading to stability and comfort issues.

Similar designs, and others, can also be home-made with a bit of skill and some tools of course.

A relaxed view can add much detail to what you see in the eyepiece -

Dave

Edited by Dave In Vermont
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JOC    1,308

Hi Rich King, I'm just interested, how do you cope with the altitude variation in the EP?  Do you view everthing via a computer screen?

I've noticed several wheelchair users posting on SGL,  and I have already noted the contortions I have to get into to view at different heights.  This must be a problem 'cubed' for people with limited mobility and must therefore be something wheelchair astronomers have solved as there are a good number of you posting on this forum. 

 

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Flyingfuzz    28

The hobby was designed to not have enough equipment.😁

There is always something that would make the next observing session that bit better.

Don't hold back on that next item, you will never know if it would help or not until you have it.

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Alan64    336

The more kit, the more versatile the observing...

58d27c500ed8d_lockstockandbarrel.jpg.bb8d86f0bc7b036bcc737f3b8dc855c4.jpg

...but make every piece count.

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JOC    1,308

Alan64 I think that counts as a cupboard-full!

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